Spring Show / 2012

Spring Show / 2012
10 November - 07 December 2012
Installation View

Gerhard Marx

Lungs, 2012 Plant material and tissue paper on acrylic and glue ground with cotton canvas board 50 x 50 cm

Gerhard Marx

Lungs (Mother and Child), 2012 Plant material and tissue paper on acrylic and glue ground with cotton canvas board 50 x 50 cm

Walter Oltmann

Caterpillar Bristle Suit III, 2011 Aluminium wire 98 x 110 x 60cm

Brett Murray

The Department of Higher Education on the March, 2012 Plastic, wood and paint 155 x 177 x 4 cm

Peace Process, 2011 Oil on canvas

Sam Nhlengethwa & Marguerite Stephens

The Nightshift, 2011 Woven mohair tapestry 243 x 340 cm

Broomberg & Chanarin

The Day Nobody Died V, June 10 2008, 2008 C-print, Mounted on Aluminum 76.2 x 600 cm

Broomberg & Chanarin

The Press Conference, June 9 (from: The day nobody died) SOLD, 2010 C-print, Mounted on Aluminum, & digital film (Ed. of 12, duration 23 mins) 76, 2 x 600 cm

Clive van den Berg

Hand, 2012 Oil on canvas Work: 180 x 140 x 5 cm

Stuart Bird

All Fucked Up, 2012 Imbuia wood on Shattered Mirror 36 x 65 x 10 cm

Kendell Geers

Bladerunner XIV, 2012 Mild steel and razor mesh 120 x 51 x 51cm

Rose Shakinovsky

PC, 2007/9 2 wooden sculptures, magnifying glass, postcard, and stands

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 5 (0643), 2012 Inkjet prints 22 x 32cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 3 (0641), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 4 (0642), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 23 (0661), 2012 Inkjet Print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 15 (0653), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 22 (0660), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 26 (0664), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 14 (0652), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 12 (0650), 2012 Inkjet print 22 x 32cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 21 (0659), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 25 (0663), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 11 (0649), 2012 Inkjet print 22 x 32cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 20 (0658), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 30 (0668), 2012 Inkjet Print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 18 (0656), 2012 Inkjet Print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 19 (0657), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 13 (0651), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 27 (0665), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 9 (0647), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 6 (0644), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 24 (0662), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 17 (0655), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 16 (0654), 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Mikhael Subotzky

Moses and Griffiths, Film Still 8 (0646), 2012 Inkjet print 22 x 32cm

Mikhael Subotzky

29 (0667)Moses and Griffiths, Film Still , 2012 Inkjet print Work: 22 x 33 cm

Sue Williamson

Other Voices: It's a mistake to ask for advice, Napoli, 2012 Pigment inks on cotton rag 100 x 1096 cm

Moshekwa Langa

Two People, 2002 Mixed media on paper 122 x 86 cm

Clive van den Berg

Man Loses History VI, 2012 Oil on Canvas Work: 200 x 150 x 5 cm

Sam Nhlengethwa

Senegalese, 2012 Oil and collage on canvas Work: 90 x 120 x 8 cm

Sam Nhlengethwa

...On the Red Brick Wall, 2012 Acrylic, oil and charcoal on paper 50 x 70 cm

Sam Nhlengethwa

... Against the Bricks and Tar, 2012 Acrylic, oil and charcoal on paper 70 x 50 cm

Brett Murray

Populists Just Love a Fancy Dress Party (triptych), 2012 Plastic, wood and paint 3 elements, 78 x 78 x 4 cm each

Stuart Bird

Writing on the Wall: ItsALongWayBackFromHell, 2012 Inbuia Wood and Shattered Mirror 40 x 90 x 6.5 cm

No 3D loaded yet

Kendell Geers

South African-born, Belgian artist Kendell Geers changed his date of birth to May 1968 in order to give birth to himself as a work of art. Describing himself as an ‘AniMystikAKtivist’, Geers takes a syncretic approach to art that weaves together diverse Afro-European traditions, including animism, alchemy, mysticism, ritual and a socio-political activism laced with black humour, irony and cultural contradiction.

Geers’s work has been shown in numerous international group exhibitions, including the Venice Biennale (2007) and Documenta (2002). Major solo shows include Heart of Darkness at Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town (1993), Third World Disorder at Goodman Gallery Cape Town (2010) and more recently Songs of Innocence and of Experience at Goodman Gallery Johannesburg (2012). His exhibition Irrespektiv travelled to Newcastle, Ghent, Salamanca and Lyon between 2007 and 2009. Geers was included on Art Unlimited at Art 42 Basel in 2011. Work by Geers was included on Manifesta 9 in Genk, Limburg, Belgium and a major survey show of his work was exhibited at Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany in 2013. Earlier this year Geers held a solo exhibition, The Second Coming (Do What Thou Wilt), at Rua Red in Dublin.

Clive van den Berg

Clive van den Berg, artist, curator and designer, works on his own and in collaboration with colleagues in a collective called trace, whose primary activities are the development of public projects. He has had several solo exhibitions in South Africa, and his work is regularly exhibited abroad. His public projects have included the artworks for landmark Northern Cape Legislature and, since he has joined the trace team, museum projects for the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Constitution Hill, Freedom Park, the Workers Museum, The Holocaust and Genocide Centre and many other projects.

Van den Berg has much experience working on large-scale institutional projects with teams representing diverse constituencies: urban planners and policy makers, architects, landscape designers, museum curators, historians, community liaison officials and representatives of local and national governments. In the Northern Cape, for example, where he worked with the Luis Ferreira da Silva architects, he pioneered a new strategy for integrating forms of the local landscape and indigenous aesthetics into the overall building design, while also training local artisans as part of a skills transference project aimed at long-term sustainability. The result is a world-renowned and uniquely South African state edifice: a monument to the people of the Northern Cape.

At Constitution Hill, his design ethos strove to fuse old materials with new curatorial strategies: to preserve individual and collective memory about the prisons and experiences that people had in them, while also educating future publics about the place of the prisons in South African history, and creating aesthetic forms appropriate to the institution.

In contemporary South Africa, much public institutional design is aimed at the cultivation of memory and the memorialization of the past. Van den Berg’s integrative approach to art, design and architectural construction has allowed him to produce spaces in which previously unheard or even suppressed narratives can be articulated. His design work on the exhibitions for the Mandela Foundation have been oriented toward this end: in showcasing materials from the Foundation’s archive, he has developed exciting new formats and vocabularies in which to reveal a past that had hitherto remained largely unknown, making it accessible to a new generation of South African citizens.

Brett Murray

Brett Murray studied at the University of Cape Town where he was awarded his Master’s of Fine Arts degree in 1988 with distinction. The title of his dissertation is ‘A Group of Satirical Sculptures Examining Social and Political Paradoxes in the South African Context’. As an undergraduate he won Irma Stern Scholarships in both 1981 and 1982. He won the Simon Garson Prize for the most Promising student in 1982 and was awarded the Michaelis Prize in 1983. As a postgraduate student he received a Human Sciences Research Council bursary, a University of Cape Town Research Scholarship, the Jules Kramer Grant and an Irma Stern Scholarship.

He has exhibited extensively in South Africa and abroad. From 1991 to 1994 he established the sculpture department at the University of Stellenbosch, where he curated the show ‘Thirty Sculptors from the Western Cape’ in 1992. In 1995 he curated, with Kevin Brand, ‘Scurvy’, at the Castle of Good Hope in Cape Town. That year he co-curated ‘Junge Kunst Aus Zud Afrika’ for the Hänel Gallery in Frankfurt, Germany.

In 1999, Brett co-founded, with artists and cultural practitioners Lisa Brice, Kevin Brand, Bruce Gordon, Andrew Putter, Sue Williamson, Robert Weinek and Lizza Littlewort, ‘Public Eye’, a Section 27 company that manage and initiate art projects in the public arena with the aims to develop a greater profile for public art in Cape Town. They have initiated projects on Robben Island, worked with the cities health officials on aids awareness campaigns and initiated outdoor sculpture projects including ‘The Spier Sculpture Biennale’. He curated ‘Homeport’ in 2001 which saw 15 artists create site specific text based works in Cape Town’s waterfront precinct. Public Eye have interfaced with cultural funding bodies as consultants and hosted multi-media events across the city.

Murray was included on the Cuban Biennial of 1994, and subsequently his works where exhibited at the Ludwig Museum of Contemporary Art in Germany. He was included on the group show, ‘Springtime in Chile’ at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Santiago, Chile. He was also part of the travelling show ‘Liberated Voices, Contemporary Art From South Africa’ which opened at the Museum for African Art in New York in 1998. His work formed part of the shows ‘Min(d)fields’ at the Kunsthaus in Baselland, Switzerland in 2004 and ‘The Geopolitics of Animation‘ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporaneo in Seville in Spain in 2007. He won the Cape Town Urban Art competition in 1998 that resulted in the public work ‘Africa’, a 3.5 metre bronze sculpture, being erected in Cape Town’s city centre. He won, with Stefaans Samcuia, the commission to produce an 8 × 30 meter wall sculpture for the foyer of the Cape Town International Convention Centre in 2003. In 2007 he completed ‘Specimens’, a large wall sculpture for the University Of Cape Town’s medical school campus. In 2011 he produced the public artwork ‘Seeds’ for The University of Bloemfontein and in 2013 he was commissioned to produce the 7 meter bronze ‘Citizen’ for the Auto & General Park in Johannesburg.

His solo shows include: ‘White Boy Sings the Blues’ at the Rembrandt Gallery in Johannesburg in 1996, ‘I love Africa’ at the Bell-Roberts Gallery in Cape Town in 2000, ‘Us and Them’ at the Axis Gallery in New York in 2003 and ‘Sleep Sleep’ at the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg in 2006. His solo show, ‘Crocodile Tears’, was held at both the Cape Town and Johannesburg branches of The Goodman Gallery in 2007 and 2009. His recent show, ‘Hail To The Thief’, was first held at the Goodman Gallery in Cape Town in 2010, and then at the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg in 2012. He was nominated as the Standard Bank Young Artist of the year in 2002.

Broomberg & Chanarin

Adam Broomberg (born 1970, Johannesburg, South Africa) and Oliver Chanarin (born
1971, London, UK) are artists living and working between London and Berlin. They are
professors of photography at the Hochschule für bildende Künste (HFBK) in Hamburg
and teach on the MA Photography & Society programme at The Royal Academy of Art
(KABK),The Hague which they co-designed.

Their work considers themes of surveillance, warfare, and institutional authority. Having
stood at the frontlines of war, Broomberg and Chanarin have captured zones of
conflict not as documentarians, but rather as unassuming witnesses. Their images have
resisted the allure of being purely representational, and have instead considered how
a photograph can capture more than just a visual encounter. Tackling politics,religion,
war and history, Broomberg and Chanarin prise open the fault lines associated with such
imagery, creating new responses and pathways towards an understanding of the human
condition.

Together they have had numerous solo exhibitions most recently at The Centre Georges
Pompidou (2018) and the Hasselblad Center (2017). Their participation in international
group shows include the Yokohama Trienniale (2017), Documenta, Kassel (2017), The
British Art Show 8 (2015-2017), Conflict, Time, Photography at Tate Modern (2015);
Shanghai Biennale (2014); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2014); Tate Britain (2014),
and the Gwanju Biennale (2012). Their work is held in major public and private collections
including Pompidou, Tate, MoMA, Yale, Stedelijk, V&A, the Art Gallery of Ontario,
Cleveland Museum of Art, and Baltimore Museum of Art. Major awards include the ICP
Infinity Award (2014) for Holy Bible, and the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize (2013)
for War Primer 2. Broomberg and Chanarin are the winners of the Arles Photo Text
Award 2018 for their paper back edition of War Primer 2, published by MACK.

Gerhard Marx

Gerhard Marx (b. South Africa, 1976) develops his projects through an engagement with pre-existent conventions and practices. This process entails careful acts of dissection and rearrangement, which allow Marx to engage the poetic potential and philosophical assumptions of his chosen material, developing original drawing, sculptural and performative languages. Marx completed his undergraduate degree at the Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT and received his MA (Fine Art) (Cum Laude) from Wits School of Art, Johannesburg.

Ecstatic Archive is Marx’s sixth solo project with the Goodman Gallery. Marx’s work is shown regularly at international art fairs, held in numerous public and private art collections and was included on the South African pavilion at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Marx has been involved in the making of numerous public sculptures, including The World On Its Hind Legs, a collaboration with William Kentridge (Beverley Hills, LA), Vertical Aerial: JHB, (the Old Ford, Constitution Hill, Johannesburg), The Fire Walker, in collaboration with William Kentridge (Queen Elizabeth Bridge, Johannesburg) and Paper Pigeon, in collaboration with Maja Marx (Pigeon Square, Johannesburg). In 2018 Marx participated in the third season at the Centre for the Less Good Idea with his project Vehicle, in collaboration with musicians Shane Cooper and Kyle Shepherd. Vehicle is scheduled to form part of the Holland Festival in June 2019.
He has extensive experience in theatre, as a scenographer, director, filmmaker and playmaker, including REwind: A Cantata for Voice, Tape and Testimony (directed by Marx, interactive film by Gerhard Marx and Maja Marx, composed by Philip Miller), performed at the Royal Festival Hall, Southbank, London (2010), the Market Theatre, Johannesburg (2008) and the 62’Centre, William College, Massachusetts (2007).

Marx is a fellow of the Sundance Film Institute, the Annenberg Fund and of the Ampersand Foundation.

Mikhael Subotzky

Mikhael Subotzky (b. 1981, Cape Town) is a Johannesburg based artist whose works in multiple mediums (including film installation, video, photography, collage and painting) attempt to engage critically with the instability of images and the politics of representation. Subotzky has exhibited in a series of important international exhibitions, including most recently Inheritance: Recent Video Art from Africa at the Fowler Museum (UCLA) in Los Angeles (2019) and Ex Africa in various venues in Brazil (2017-18). His award-winning Ponte City project (co-authored with Patrick Waterhouse) was presented at Art Basel Unlimited in 2018. The full exhibition and archive of this project has since been acquired by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and will be the subject of a monographic exhibition there in the fall of 2020.

Subotzky’s work is collected widely by international institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art (New York), Solomon R Guggenheim Museum (New York), the National Gallery of Art (Washington), Tate (London), Centre Pompidou (Paris), and the South African National Gallery, among others.

Subotzky’s work was included in the Lubumbashi (2013) and Liverpool (2012) biennials. Pixel Interface, a multi-component video installation, was included in All The World’s Futures, curated by Okwui Enwezor at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015).

Sue Williamson

Sue Williamson (b. 1941, Lichfield, UK) emigrated with her family to South Africa in 1948. Trained as a printmaker, Williamson also works in installation, photography and video. In the 1970s, she started to make work which addressed social change during apartheid and by the 1980s Williamson was well known for her series of portraits of women involved in the country’s political struggle. A Few South Africans is one such a series where she celebrates women who had played roles in the fight for freedom.

Referring to her practice, Williamson states: “You become aware of the audience to whom you speak. In that sense, you think backwards: what you have to say, whom you say it to, and how it will reach the audience. Having to consider your work through the eyes of somebody who knows nothing about you as an artist and what you are doing is a useful exercise.” Williamson has managed to avoid the rut of being caught in an apartheid-era aesthetic, “I am never particularly interested in doing what I did the last time. I take one thing and work it out a number of ways.”

In 2018, Williamson was Goodman Gallery’s featured artist at the FNB Joburg Art Fair, where she exhibited her work Messages from the Atlantic Passage, a large-scale installation of shackled, suspended glass bottles engraved with profiles of 19th-century victims of slavery. This installation was also exhibited that year at Art Basel in Switzerland and at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India.

Williamson’s works feature in numerous public collections across the globe, including those at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA, Tate Modern, London, UK, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA, Wifredo Lam Centre, Havana, Cuba, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa, and Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa.

Williamson has received various awards and fellowships such as the Bellagio Creative Arts Fellowship 2011, Italy, Rockefeller Foundation, the Visual Artist Research Award Fellowship 2007, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA and the Lucas Artists Residency Fellowship 2005, Montalvo Art Center, California, USA.

Sue Williamson lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa.

Kudzanai Chiurai

Kudzanai Chiurai (b. 1981, Zimbabwe) was born one year after Zimbabwe’s emergence from white-ruled Rhodesia. Chiurai incorporates various media into his practice, which is largely focused around cycles of political, economic and social strife present in post-colonial societies.

Chiurai’s artwork confronts viewers with the psychological and physical experience of African metropolises. From large mixed media works and paintings to photography and video, Chiurai tackles some of the most pressing issues facing these environments, such as xenophobia, displacement and inequality.

Chiurai has held numerous solo exhibitions since 2003 and has participated in various local and international exhibitions, such as ‘Figures & Fictions: Contemporary South African Photography’ (2011) at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and ‘Impressions from South Africa, 1965 to Now’ (2011) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Other notable exhibitions include ‘The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory and Hell Revisited’ curated by Simon Njami at Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt (2014) and SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah USA (2015), as well as ‘Art/Afrique, Le nouvel atelier’ (2017) at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris, ‘Regarding the Ease of Others’ (2017) at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa, ‘Genesis [Je n’isi isi]- We Live in Silence’ at IFA in Stuttgart, Germany and ‘Ubuntu, a Lucid Dream’ (2020) at the Palais de Tokyo in Paris.

Chiurai’s ‘Conflict Resolution’ series was exhibited at dOCUMENTA (13) (2012) in Kassel and the film ‘Iyeza’ was one of the few African films to be included in the New Frontier shorts programme at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013. Chiurai has held numerous solo exhibitions with Goodman Gallery and has edited four publications with contributions by leading African creatives.

At present the artist lives and works in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Sam Nhlengethwa

Sam Nhlengethwa was born in the mining community of Payneville Springs in 1955 and grew up in Ratanda location in Heidelberg, east of Johannesburg. He completed a two-year Fine Art Diploma at the Rorkes Drift Art Centre in the late 1970s. While he exhibited extensively both locally and abroad during the 1980s and ’90s, Nhlengethwa’s travelling solo show South Africa, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow in 1993 established him at the vanguard of critical consciousness in South Africa and he went on to win the Standard Bank Young Artist Award in 1994.

Nhlengethwa was born into a family of jazz lovers; his two brothers both collected jazz music and his deceased eldest brother was a jazz musician. “Painting jazz pieces is an avenue or outlet for expressing my love for the music,” he once said in an interview. "As I paint, I listen to jazz and visualise the performance. Jazz performers improvise within the conventions of their chosen styles. In an ensemble, for example, there are vocal styles that include freedom of vocal colour, call-and-response patterns and rhythmic complexities played by different members. Painting jazz allows me to literally put colour onto these vocal colours.

“Jazz is rhythmic and it emphasises interpretation rather than composition. There are deliberate tonal distortions that contribute to its uniqueness. My jazz collages, with their distorted patterns, attempt to communicate all of this. As a collagist and painter, fortunately, the technique allows me this freedom of expression… What I am doing is not new though, as there are other artists before me who painted jazz pieces. For example, Gerard Sekoto, Romare Bearden and Henri Matisse.”

Nhlengethwa’s work has been included in key exhibitions such as Seven Stories About Modern Art in Africa at the Whitechapel Gallery in London and major publications such as Phaidon’s The 20th Century Art Book. He has had several solo shows in South Africa and abroad, exhibiting in the 12th International Cairo Biennale (2010) and in Constructions: Contemporary Art from South Africa at Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Niteroi (2011) in Brazil. In 2018 Nhlengethwa was included on the group exhibition Beyond Borders: Global Africa at the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Walter Oltmann

Born in 1960 in Rustenburg, Gauteng, South Africa, Walter Oltmann’s main area of focus is sculpture, and more particularly in fabricating woven wire forms, which sometimes reference local craft traditions. He has researched and written on the use of wire in African material culture in this region and is deeply interested in the influence of these traditions in contemporary South African art. He has had numerous solo exhibitions with the Goodman Gallery, and has created several large-scale commissions for venues such as the Zeitz Sculpture Garden in Segera, Kenya.