Sue Williamson / All Our Mothers / 2013

Sue Williamson / All Our Mothers / 2013
15 August - 14 September 2013
Installation View

Sue Williamson

Helen Joseph, Cape Town, 1983 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm

Sue Williamson

Brigalia Bam, Pretoria, 2012 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39 cm Work: 71.5 x 51.5 cm Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Virginia Mngoma, Alexandra, Johannesburg, 1984 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39 cm Work: 71.5 x 51.5 cm Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Bed Camp, Crossroads, Cape Town, 1983 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm; Paper 71.5 x 51.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Esslina Silinga, Langa Graveyard, 1995 Archival ink on archival paper Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Ellen Khuzwayo, Cape Town, 1983 Archival ink on archival paper Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Mamphela Ramphela, University of Cape Town, 1985 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm; Paper 71.5 x 51.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Fatima Meer, Cape Town, 1989 Archival inks on archival paper Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Gertrude Shope, Pretoria, 2012 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39 cm Work: 71.5 x 51.5 cm Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Cheryl Carolus, Cape Town, 1990 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm; Paper 71.5 x 51.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Ilse Fischer Wilson, 2013 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 61 x 39 cm Frame: 76 x 56 x 4 cm

Sue Williamson

Judy Seidman, 2002 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm; Paper 71.5 x 51.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Rebecca Kotane, Soweto , 2013 Archival ink on archival paper Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

Vesta Smith, Noordgesig, Soweto , 2012 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39 cm Work: 71.5 x 51.5 cm Frame: 76 x 56 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

All Our Mothers: Caroline Motsoaledi, Soweto , 2012 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm

Sue Williamson

Amina Cachalia, Fordsburg, 2012 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 60 x 40 cm Frame: 76 x 56 x 4 cm

Sue Williamson

Rica Hodgson, Johannesburg, 2012 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm; Paper 71.5 x 51.5 cm Frame: 56 x 76

Sue Williamson

All Our Mothers: Amina Cachalia, Fordsburg, 1984 Archival ink on archival paper Image: 58 x 39cm

Sue Williamson

Annie Silinga, Langa II, 1983 Archival inks on archival paper Image: 39 x 58 cm Work: 52 x 72 cm Frame: 56 x 76 x 4.5 cm

Sue Williamson

There's something I must tell you, 2013 Six screen video installation

No 3D loaded yet

Sue Williamson’s multimedia exhibition All Our Mothers, seen earlier this year at Goodman Gallery Johannesburg, travels to Cape Town this August. The show celebrates the strength of the extraordinary women who helped to bring this country to freedom, and examines the generation gap between these wise, iconic veterans of the struggle, and their granddaughters, the confident young born frees.

Williamson’s multi-screen video installation There’s something I must tell you portrays six intense conversations in which the older women recall important moments of their histories and their lives, and the younger women respond, and present their own forthright views on living in South Africa right now. Stories of exile, of the women’s march, of imprisonment evoke the ultimate question: Was it all worth it? The answers are sometimes surprising.

In making the series, Williamson worked with such key figures as the charismatic Amina Cachalia, to whom this exhibition is dedicated, the distinguished Dr Brigalia Bam, the 101-year-old Rebecca Kotane, Carollne Motsoaledi, widow of Rivonia triallist Elias Motsoaledi, Ilse Fischer, activist daughter of Afrikaner lawyer Bram Fischer, and liberation movement heroine Vesta Smith.

Amina Cachalia and Caroline Motsoaledi were two of the women portrayed in Williamson’s portfolio of etchings/screenprints of the 1980s, A Few South Africans, a series that was reproduced and widely distributed as postcards at a time when images of these women were rarely seen in the press. Today, those postcards and prints are in such museum collections as the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the V&A Museum in London, and the Walther Collection in Germany.

There’s something I must tell you originated when Williamson was a Rockefeller Foundation Creative Arts Fellow in Bellagio, Italy in 2011 and received a phone call from Amina Cachalia to contribute to a book at the very moment the artist was thinking she would like to interview and photograph Amina again, and to reconsider the important contribution of that generation almost 20 years into the new democracy. And so the new project began.

Accompanying the video installation is a new series of more than twenty photographic portraits of women taken over a thirty year period.

The artist is greatly indebted to the National Arts Council of South Africa, the Goethe Institute and Business Arts South Africa for support for All Our Mothers. The producer of There’s something I must tell you is Monkey Films’ Clare van Zyl.

Sue Williamson

Sue Williamson (b. 1941, Lichfield, UK) emigrated with her family to South Africa in 1948. Trained as a printmaker, Williamson also works in installation, photography and video. In the 1970s, she started to make work which addressed social change during apartheid and by the 1980s Williamson was well known for her series of portraits of women involved in the country’s political struggle. A Few South Africans is one such a series where she celebrates women who had played roles in the fight for freedom.

Referring to her practice, Williamson states: “You become aware of the audience to whom you speak. In that sense, you think backwards: what you have to say, whom you say it to, and how it will reach the audience. Having to consider your work through the eyes of somebody who knows nothing about you as an artist and what you are doing is a useful exercise.” Williamson has managed to avoid the rut of being caught in an apartheid-era aesthetic, “I am never particularly interested in doing what I did the last time. I take one thing and work it out a number of ways.”

In 2018, Williamson was Goodman Gallery’s featured artist at the FNB Joburg Art Fair, where she exhibited her work Messages from the Atlantic Passage, a large-scale installation of shackled, suspended glass bottles engraved with profiles of 19th-century victims of slavery. This installation was also exhibited that year at Art Basel in Switzerland and at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India.

Williamson’s works feature in numerous public collections across the globe, including those at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA, Tate Modern, London, UK, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA, Wifredo Lam Centre, Havana, Cuba, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa, and Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa.

Williamson has received various awards and fellowships such as the Bellagio Creative Arts Fellowship 2011, Italy, Rockefeller Foundation, the Visual Artist Research Award Fellowship 2007, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA and the Lucas Artists Residency Fellowship 2005, Montalvo Art Center, California, USA.

Sue Williamson lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa.