Clive van den Berg / New Work / 2008

Clive van den Berg / New Work / 2008
11 October - 01 November 2008
Installation View
Clive van den Berg / New Work / 2008
11 October - 01 November 2008
Installation View
Clive van den Berg / New Work / 2008
11 October - 01 November 2008
Installation View
Clive van den Berg / New Work / 2008
11 October - 01 November 2008
Installation View
Clive van den Berg / New Work / 2008
11 October - 01 November 2008
Installation View
Clive van den Berg / New Work / 2008
11 October - 01 November 2008
Installation View

Clive van den Berg

Map, Receiving And Expelling II, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment

Clive van den Berg

Greeting, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 23.5 x 21.5 x 7 cm

Clive van den Berg

Thinking Back Looking Ahead, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 23.5 x 19 x 13.5 cm

Clive van den Berg

Weight Lifter, 2008 Monoprint 174 x 71 cm

Clive van den Berg

Ghost With Surrogate, 2008 Monoprint 76 x 57 cm

Clive van den Berg

Unaware Sleepers, 2008 Monoprint 76 x 57 cm

Clive van den Berg

Scavenging Ghosts, 2008 Monoprint 57 x 76 cm

Clive van den Berg

Event, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 29 x 26 x 12 cm

Clive van den Berg

Sleepers Archive, 2008 Monoprint 174 x 71 cm

Clive van den Berg

Improbable Family, 2008 Monoprint 76 x 57 cm

Clive van den Berg

Improbable Kiss, 2008 Monoprint 57 x 76 cm

Clive van den Berg

Lines Of Beauty, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 37.5 x 25 x 8 cm

Clive van den Berg

Supplicant: Stones, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 36.5 x 25 x 7 cm

Clive van den Berg

Supplicant: Wood, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 38 x 25 x 6 cm

Clive van den Berg

Disguise, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 39 x 23 x 4 cm

Clive van den Berg

Expiation, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 47 x 15 x 5 cm

Clive van den Berg

New Paisley, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 29.5 x 46 x 9 cm

Clive van den Berg

Account, 2008 Monoprint 174 x 71 cm

Clive van den Berg

Archival Waste, 2008 Monoprint 57 x 76 cm

Clive van den Berg

Ghost Claiming Man, 2008 Monoprint 76 x 57 cm

Clive van den Berg

Retrospect, 2008 Monoprint 174 x 71 cm

Clive van den Berg

A Temporary Vanity, 2008 Monoprint 76 x 57 cm

Clive van den Berg

Generations, 2008 Monoprint 174 x 71 cm

Clive van den Berg

Master's Eye, 2008 Monoprint 57 x 76 cm

Clive van den Berg

Journeyman, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 35 x 16 x 4 cm

Clive van den Berg

Scaffold, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment dimensions variable

Clive van den Berg

Weary Vanity, 2008 Monoprint 174 x 71 cm

Clive van den Berg

Wounds Graced By Flowers, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 178 x 63 x 60 cm

Clive van den Berg

Sleep of Echoes, 2008 Wood, wax and pigment 39 x 24 x 7 cm

Clive van den Berg

Ghosts And Their Surrogates, 2008 Monoprint 57 x 76 cm

Clive van den Berg

Map, Receiving And Expelling I, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment

Clive van den Berg

Sleepers With Room For Ghost, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 20 x 25 x 11 cm

Clive van den Berg

Tribute, 2008 Wood, wax and pigment 26.5 x 24 x 16 cm

Clive van den Berg

Supplicant: Water, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 37 x 24 x 6 cm

Clive van den Berg

Innocent And Ghost, 2008 Monoprint 174 x 71 cm

Clive van den Berg

Clearing, 2008 Monoprint 76 x 51 cm

Clive van den Berg

Of Giotto And Egypt, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 60 x 18.5 x 10.5 cm

Clive van den Berg

Underneath, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment Work: 38 x 24 x 6 cm

Clive van den Berg

Lineage, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment 31 x 20 x 8.5 cm

Clive van den Berg

Notes Against Amnesia, 2008 Wood, Wax And Pigment dimensions variable

No 3D loaded yet

Clive van den Berg has forged a distinguished career as an artist, curator, designer, lecturer and cultural activist. He is known as much for his intelligence and lively wit as he is for his extraordinary craftsmanship in painting, sculpture, printmaking and in film. Most recently he was Curator of Spier Contemporary (2007) and is currently the Curator/Designer of The Workers Museum, Newtown, Johannesburg and of several public projects in Sharpeville, Soweto and at Freedom Park, Pretoria. Van den Berg is represented in major public collections including Iziko South African National Gallery.

Visual and verbal languages with which to explore the possibilities of being other are central to Van den Berg’s work. His current exhibition departs from convention, challenges assumptions about media, expresses concerns about the state of art and of nation and explores anxieties about the fate of a ravaged planet. But Van den Berg’s strength lies, above all, in his assertions of the possibilities of being otherwise in order to make opportunities for transformation without forgetfulness.

Clive van den Berg

Clive van den Berg, artist, curator and designer, works on his own and in collaboration with colleagues in a collective called trace, whose primary activities are the development of public projects. He has had several solo exhibitions in South Africa, and his work is regularly exhibited abroad. His public projects have included the artworks for landmark Northern Cape Legislature and, since he has joined the trace team, museum projects for the Nelson Mandela Foundation, Constitution Hill, Freedom Park, the Workers Museum, The Holocaust and Genocide Centre and many other projects.

Van den Berg has much experience working on large-scale institutional projects with teams representing diverse constituencies: urban planners and policy makers, architects, landscape designers, museum curators, historians, community liaison officials and representatives of local and national governments. In the Northern Cape, for example, where he worked with the Luis Ferreira da Silva architects, he pioneered a new strategy for integrating forms of the local landscape and indigenous aesthetics into the overall building design, while also training local artisans as part of a skills transference project aimed at long-term sustainability. The result is a world-renowned and uniquely South African state edifice: a monument to the people of the Northern Cape.

At Constitution Hill, his design ethos strove to fuse old materials with new curatorial strategies: to preserve individual and collective memory about the prisons and experiences that people had in them, while also educating future publics about the place of the prisons in South African history, and creating aesthetic forms appropriate to the institution.

In contemporary South Africa, much public institutional design is aimed at the cultivation of memory and the memorialization of the past. Van den Berg’s integrative approach to art, design and architectural construction has allowed him to produce spaces in which previously unheard or even suppressed narratives can be articulated. His design work on the exhibitions for the Mandela Foundation have been oriented toward this end: in showcasing materials from the Foundation’s archive, he has developed exciting new formats and vocabularies in which to reveal a past that had hitherto remained largely unknown, making it accessible to a new generation of South African citizens.