FNB Art Joburg 2019
13 September - 15 September 2019
Installation View
Kudzanai Chiurai
Untitled IV, 2018
Mixed media on Saunders archival cotton rag paper
Work: 64 x 88 cm Frame: 77 x 101 x 3.5 cm
Gerald Machona
BRICS, 2018
Glass, copper and decommissioned currency
Work: 65 x 25 x 25 cm
David Koloane
Mgodoyi 4, 2007
Charcoal and acrylic
Work: 70 x 100 cm
David Koloane
Mgodoyi 6, 2007
Charcoal and acrylic
Work: 70 x 109.7 cm
Kiluanji Kia Henda
The Last Journey of the Dictator Mussunda N'zombo Before the Great Extinction (Act III) , 2017
Inkjet print on cotton paper
150 x 225 cm
Samson Kambalu
Bird S. tereograph, 2017
Digital photgraph
Image: 16.7 x 44.5 cm
Mikhael Subotzky
The Dutch Gangster #1 , 2017
Oil and ink on canvas
Work: 102 x 76 cm
Samson Kambalu
Revelator Stereograph, 2017
Digital Photograph
Work: 16.7 x 44.5 cm
Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse
Hallelujah's first job when he moved to Ponte in 1981 was to clean the swimming pool (0435), 2008
Inkjet print
Paper size: 125.5 x 150cm, Image size: 105 x 131cm
Samson Kambalu
Slow Hand Stereograph, 2017
Digital Photograph
Work: 16.7 x 44.5 cm
Ghada Amer & Reza Farkhondeh
Mutual Consent, 2017
Acrylic, tape, fabric on pellon
Work: 98.4 x 118.7 cm Frame: 110.5 x 131 x 4.5 cm

Fly Swatter Stereograph, 2017
Digital Photograph

Misheck Masamvu
Splinter, 2019
Oil on canvas
Image: 84.2 x 74.3 cm
Gerhard Marx
Everywhere Everything, 2019
Reconfigured map fragments on acrylic ground and canvas
Work: 100 x 120 cm
Tracey Rose
War hog, 2008
digital print in pigment inks
80 x 60 cm
William Kentridge
Fill, 2017
Bronze
Work: 84.5 x 80 x 44 cm Weight 112 kg
Sydney Kumalo
Study for Joyous Forms III, 1982
pencil and chalk pastel on paper
42 x 59 cm (paper)
Mikhael Subotzky
Acting: The First Six Lessons , 2019
Ink on found book cover
Work: 19.1 x 35.2 cm
Haroon Gunn-Salie and Aline Xavier
Prophecy - Obadiah, 2016
M1 reinforced with polyurethane foam

William Kentridge
Untitled (On the Reliability of Prophets), 2019
Indian ink on found pages
Work: 169 x 167 cm
Haroon Gunn-Salie and Aline Xavier
Prophecy - Habakkuk, 2016
M1 reinforced with polyurethane foam

Misheck Masamvu
Chewed Memory, 2018
Oil on Canvas
Work: 240 x 210 cm
Haroon Gunn-Salie and Aline Xavier
Prophecy - Isaiah, 2016
M1 reinforced with polyurethane foam

David Goldblatt
Deserted farm. Holgatsfontein in the Leeukopspan area, between Britstown and Vosburg, Northern Cape. 16 March 2008 (4_A0262), 2008
Digital print in pigment inks on cotton rag paper
A2 23.4 x 16.5cm
Kapwani Kiwanga
TRI (blue and white), 2018
Shadecloth, steel frame, paint
Work: 180 x 110 x 40 cm
David Goldblatt
Structures: A new shack under construction, Lenasia Extension 9, Lenasia, Johannesburg, 5 May 1990 4_6319, 5 May 1990
Silver gelatin photograph
Approx 30 x 40 cm
Ernesto Neto
Escutando a barriga da terra Listening to the belly of the earth, 2018
Printed cotton fabric , wooden knobs and sand
Work: 115 x 84 x 80 cm
David Goldblatt
The city from the south-west, Johannesburg (3_9343), Jan 1964
Silver gelatin print on fibre-based paper
Work: 28 x 42 cm Frame: 43.5 x 56 cm
Kudzanai Chiurai
Untitled XI (Miracle of overthrowing Mother), 2019
Mixed media on Saunders archival cotton rag paper
Work: 76 x 57 cm Frame: 90 x 70 x 3 cm
David Goldblatt
Ore train and amputated headgear, Geduld, Springs. (2_1481), July 1965
Silver gelatin on fibre based paper
P:44 x 43.5cm
William Kentridge
That Which I Do Not Remember, 2017
Relief, printed from 12 woodblocks on Somerset Velvet, Soft White, 300 gsm. Final work comprised of 28 individual sheets adhered by 47 Aluminum pins.
209.3 x 199.5 cm (edges irregular)
Kudzanai Chiurai
Untitled XII (Must have Political Content), 2019
Mixed media on Saunders archival cotton rag paper
Work: 76 x 57 cm Frame: 90 x 70 x 3 cm
Gerhard Marx
Landscape Study, 2018
Reconfigured Map Fragments on Acrylic-Polyurethane Ground and Canvas
Work: 140 x 180 cm
Walter Oltmann
Razor Brush Disguise, 2014
aluminium wire
98 x 85 x 60 cm
Nolan Oswald Dennis
habeas viscus (systems vocabulary), 2019
13 ink, collage and annotation on paper drawings
33 x 46 cm each
Sam Nhlengethwa
Delivery Boy, 2017
Collage, oil and acrylic on canvas
100 cm x 120 cm
David Koloane
Entry-Exit, 2016
Mixed Media on paper
165 x 149.5 cm
Robert Hodgins
Off to the Charity Ball, 1999/2000
oil and charcoal on canvas and wood
Work: 126 x 152 x 34 cm
William Kentridge
Drawing for Other Faces (Drive in Screen) # 3, 2011
Charcoal and coloured pencil on paper
Work: 73 x 96 cm
Cecil Skotnes
Untitled (Reclining Female Figure), 1973
Woodcut Print
48 x 32cm
George Pemba
The Rehearsal: Umbhorho, 1987
Oil on board
Work: 38.5 x 53 cm
Durant Sihlali
Series II triptych , 1999
pigment dyes and handmade paper. Numbered by date 22 September
Work (x3, each): 29.5 x 19.5 cm
William Kentridge
Anamorphic Drawing (Telephone), 2000
Charcoal and colored pencil on paper and stainless steel
Work: 80 x 112 x 3.5 cm
Robert Hodgins
In the gym, 1991
Oil on canvas
Work: 30 x 45.5 x 4 cm Frame: 33 x 48.5 x 4.5 cm
Victor Vasarely
Diade, 1973
acrylic and tempera on board
60 x 60cm
Victor Vasarely
KOSKA-NB-NEG, 1972
Oil on canvas
Work: 103 x 60 cm
Lisa Brice
Untitled VIII, 2008
Ink and gesso on canvas
Work: 91.4 x 121.6 x 2 cm
Kudzanai Chiurai
Untitled X (Contradictions), 2019
Mixed media on Saunders archival cotton rag paper
Work: 76 x 57 cm Frame: 90 x 70 x 3 cm
Kudzanai Chiurai
Untitled XVI (One table can resemble another), 2019
Mixed media on Saunders archival cotton rag paper
Work: 76 x 57 cm Frame: 90 x 70 x 3 cm

FNB Art Joburg 2019 - Installation View

13 September - 15 September 2019

Kudzanai Chiurai

Untitled IV

Gerald Machona

BRICS

David Koloane

Mgodoyi 4

David Koloane

Mgodoyi 6

Kiluanji Kia Henda

The Last Journey of the Dictator Mussunda N'zombo Before the Great Extinction (Act III)

Samson Kambalu

Bird S. tereograph

Mikhael Subotzky

The Dutch Gangster #1

Samson Kambalu

Revelator Stereograph

Mikhael Subotzky & Patrick Waterhouse

Hallelujah's first job when he moved to Ponte in 1981 was to clean the swimming pool (0435)

Samson Kambalu

Slow Hand Stereograph

Ghada Amer & Reza Farkhondeh

Mutual Consent

Fly Swatter Stereograph

Misheck Masamvu

Splinter

Gerhard Marx

Everywhere Everything

Tracey Rose

War hog

William Kentridge

Fill

Sydney Kumalo

Study for Joyous Forms III

Mikhael Subotzky

Acting: The First Six Lessons

Haroon Gunn-Salie and Aline Xavier

Prophecy - Obadiah

William Kentridge

Untitled (On the Reliability of Prophets)

Haroon Gunn-Salie and Aline Xavier

Prophecy - Habakkuk

Misheck Masamvu

Chewed Memory

Haroon Gunn-Salie and Aline Xavier

Prophecy - Isaiah

David Goldblatt

Deserted farm. Holgatsfontein in the Leeukopspan area, between Britstown and Vosburg, Northern Cape. 16 March 2008 (4_A0262)

Kapwani Kiwanga

TRI (blue and white)

David Goldblatt

Structures: A new shack under construction, Lenasia Extension 9, Lenasia, Johannesburg, 5 May 1990 4_6319

Ernesto Neto

Escutando a barriga da terra Listening to the belly of the earth

David Goldblatt

The city from the south-west, Johannesburg (3_9343)

Kudzanai Chiurai

Untitled XI (Miracle of overthrowing Mother)

David Goldblatt

Ore train and amputated headgear, Geduld, Springs. (2_1481)

William Kentridge

That Which I Do Not Remember

Kudzanai Chiurai

Untitled XII (Must have Political Content)

Gerhard Marx

Landscape Study

Walter Oltmann

Razor Brush Disguise

Nolan Oswald Dennis

habeas viscus (systems vocabulary)

Sam Nhlengethwa

Delivery Boy

David Koloane

Entry-Exit

Robert Hodgins

Off to the Charity Ball

William Kentridge

Drawing for Other Faces (Drive in Screen) # 3

Cecil Skotnes

Untitled (Reclining Female Figure)

George Pemba

The Rehearsal: Umbhorho

Durant Sihlali

Series II triptych

William Kentridge

Anamorphic Drawing (Telephone)

Robert Hodgins

In the gym

Victor Vasarely

Diade

Victor Vasarely

KOSKA-NB-NEG

Lisa Brice

Untitled VIII

Kudzanai Chiurai

Untitled X (Contradictions)

Kudzanai Chiurai

Untitled XVI (One table can resemble another)

Kendell Geers

South African-born, Belgian artist Kendell Geers changed his date of birth to May 1968 in order to give birth to himself as a work of art. Describing himself as an ‘AniMystikAKtivist’, Geers takes a syncretic approach to art that weaves together diverse Afro-European traditions, including animism, alchemy, mysticism, ritual and a socio-political activism laced with black humour, irony and cultural contradiction.

Geers’s work has been shown in numerous international group exhibitions, including the Venice Biennale (2007) and Documenta (2002). Major solo shows include Heart of Darkness at Iziko South African National Gallery in Cape Town (1993), Third World Disorder at Goodman Gallery Cape Town (2010) and more recently Songs of Innocence and of Experience at Goodman Gallery Johannesburg (2012). His exhibition Irrespektiv travelled to Newcastle, Ghent, Salamanca and Lyon between 2007 and 2009. Geers was included on Art Unlimited at Art 42 Basel in 2011. Work by Geers was included on Manifesta 9 in Genk, Limburg, Belgium and a major survey show of his work was exhibited at Haus der Kunst, Munich, Germany in 2013. Earlier this year Geers held a solo exhibition, The Second Coming (Do What Thou Wilt), at Rua Red in Dublin.

David Goldblatt

David Goldblatt (b.1930, Randfontein, South Africa) chronicled the structures, people and landscapes of his country from 1948 – through the rise of Afrikaner Nationalism, the apartheid regime and into the democratic era – until his death in June 2018. Goldblatt’s photography examines how South Africans have expressed their values through the structures, physical and ideological, that they have built. In 1989, Goldblatt founded the Market Photography Workshop in Johannesburg. In 1998 he was the first South African to have a solo exhibition at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. In 2001, a retrospective of his work, David Goldblatt Fifty-One Years began a tour of galleries and museums. He was one of the few South African artists to exhibit at Documenta 11 (2002) and Documenta 12 (2007) in Kassel, Germany. He has held solo exhibitions at the Jewish Museum and the New Museum, both in New York. His work was included in the exhibition ILLUMInations at the 54th Venice Biennale in 2011, and has featured on shows at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and Barbican Centre in London and in 2018, a major retrospective at the Centre Pompidou in Paris. Goldblatt is the recipient of the 2006 Hasselblad award, the 2009 Henri Cartier-Bresson Award, the 2013 ICP Infinity Award and in 2016, he was awarded the Commandeur des Arts et des Lettres by the Ministry of Culture of France.

David Koloane

David Koloane (1938 – 2019) was born in Alexandra, Johannesburg, South Africa. Koloane spent his career making the world a more hospitable place for black artists during and after apartheid. Koloane achieved this through his pioneering work as an artist, writer, curator, teacher and mentor to young and established artists at a time when such vocations were restricted to white people in South Africa. A large part of this effort involved the initiatives Koloane helped establish, from the first Black Art Gallery in 1977, the Thupelo experimental workshop in 1985 and the Bag Factory Artists’ Studios in 1991, where he served as director for many years. Koloane also tutored at the Federated Union of Black Artists (FUBA) in 1979 and became the head of the fine art section and gallery from 1985 to 1990.

Through his expressive, evocative and poetic artwork, Koloane interrogated the socio-political and existential human condition, using Johannesburg as his primary subject matter. Koloane’s representations of Johannesburg are populated with images of cityscapes, townships, street life, jazz musicians, traffic jams, migration, refugees, dogs, and birds among others. Imaginatively treated, through the medium of painting, drawing, assemblage, printmaking and mixed media, Koloane’s scenes are a blend of exuberant and sombre, discernible and opaque pictorial narratives.

Koloane’s work has been widely exhibited locally and internationally. In 1999 he was part of the group exhibition Liberated Voices at the National Museum of African Art in Washington DC. In 2013, Koloane’s work was shown on the South African pavilion at the 55th la Biennale di Venezia and on the group exhibition My Joburg at La Maison Rouge in Paris. In 1998, the government of the Netherlands honoured Koloane with the Prince Claus Fund Award for his contributions to South African art. Koloane was also awarded an Honorary Doctorate twice, once from Wits University in 2012, and again from Rhodes University in 2015.

Earlier this year Koloane was the subject of a travelling career survey exhibition, A Resilient Visionary: Poetic Expressions of David Koloane, which opened at IZIKO SANG in June and will travel to Standard Bank Gallery and Wits Art Museum in October.

Jessica Webster

Jessica Webster (b. 1981) was raised on the mines of the Free State and in Benoni. From a young age her proliferate painting and drawing practice was recognised as provoking the stranger qualities of the everyday: at sixteen, she sold her first major painting to the MTN Gallery in 1997. Webster entered Michaelis School of Fine Art in 2002 where she studied painting under established painters Malcolm Payne and Virginia MacKenny, attaining the Judy Stein Prize for painting upon graduation in 2005, and coming first in her class for academia and practice. In 2006, Webster survived an act of extreme violence in a shooting which left her paralysed from the waist down. Within six months of the shooting, she was being wheeled from hospital into Master’s supervision and mentorship with Penny Siopis at the University of the Witwatersrand, which resulted in her first solo show in 2009 at David Krut Projects in Johannesburg. 

The show met with great acclaim: the Johannesburg Art Gallery acquiring the centrepiece painting of the exhibition and the bulk of the work being sold to experienced collectors. Art critic Michael Smith described her work in Mail & Guardian (2009) as ‘light years ahead of the simply sensational’. At the same time, Webster embarked on an in-depth study of painting and philosophy for her Master’s degree that has resulted in the expected fulfilment of her PhD in philosophy and painting in 2017. The relationship between writing and practice has been an intensive aspect of Webster’s career thus far, which has gained her critical recognition in the form of awards from both the Oppenheimer and Mellon Foundations. In 2013, Webster was assigned as part of the Goodman Gallery’s stable of artists, upon which they have published a number of her creative writings in 2013 and held her first solo show with the gallery in 2015. Referring to the intensity of the affect from the show, art critic Sylvia McKeown writes that ‘Some objects are steeped in emotion that is so powerful that onlookers can sense the soul of the object’s creator…in everyday life we call it great art.’ This relationship between states of consciousness in painting and the power of life experience to affect form was continued in her show Wisteria at Goodman Gallery Cape Town in April 2017, a year which proved to be full of success for Webster ,who also curated the ‘Emerging Painter’s exhibition at the Turbine art Fair, and was awarded her her PhD in Philosophy at the University of the Witwatersrand with no corrections.

Nolan Oswald Dennis

Nolan Oswald Dennis is an interdisciplinary artist from Johannesburg, South Africa. His practice explores what he calls ‘a black consciousness of space’ : the material and metaphysical conditions of decolonization.

His work questions the politics of space and time through a system-specific, rather than site-specific approach. He is concerned with the hidden structures that pre-determine the limits of our social and political imagination. Through a language of diagrams, drawings and models he explores a hidden landscape of systematic and structural conditions that organise our political sub-terrain. This sub-space is framed by systems which transverse multiple realms (technical, spiritual economic, psychological, etc) and therefore Dennis’ work can be seen as an attempt to stitch these, sometime opposed, sometimes complimentary, systems together. To read technological systems alongside spiritual systems, to combine political fictions with science fiction.

He holds a degree in Architecture from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg and a Masters of Science in the Art, Culture and Technology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Reza Farkhondeh & Ghada Amer

Ghada Amer (b. 1963, Cairo, Egypt) and Reza Farkhondeh (b. 1963, Iran) have cultivated an artistic collaboration spanning over 20 years, though they have only recently begun to exhibit their collective works publicly, under the moniker RFGA. This partnership seamlessly merges their two distinctive styles to create a dynamic visual vocabulary.

Amer and Farkhondeh’s previous collaborative solo exhibitions include those at Tina Kim Fine Arts, New York, the Singapore Tyler Institute, The Stedlijk Museum in the Netherlands, Goodman Gallery Cape Town

Kapwani Kiwanga

Kapwani Kiwanga studied anthropology and comparative religion at McGill University (Montreal, CA). She has followed the program “La Seine” at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris, and also works at Le Fresnoy (a french national center for contemporary art). She was artist in residence at the MU Foundation in Eindhoven (NL) and at the Box in Bourges (FR).

Working with sound, film, performance, and objects, Kapwani Kiwanga relies on extensive research to transform raw information into investigations of historical narratives and their impact on political, social, and community formation. The Paris-based artist’s work focuses on sites specific to Africa and the African diaspora, examining how certain events expand and unfold into popular and folk narratives, and revealing how these stories take shape in objects and oral histories. Trained as an anthropologist, Kiwanga performs this role in her artistic practice, using historical information to construct narratives about groups of people. Kiwanga is not only invested in the past but also the future, telling Afrofuturist stories and creating speculative dossiers from future civilizations to reflect on the impact of historical events.

Gerhard Marx

Gerhard Marx (b. South Africa, 1976) develops his projects through an engagement with pre-existent conventions and practices. This process entails careful acts of dissection and rearrangement, which allow Marx to engage the poetic potential and philosophical assumptions of his chosen material, developing original drawing, sculptural and performative languages. Marx completed his undergraduate degree at the Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT and received his MA (Fine Art) (Cum Laude) from Wits School of Art, Johannesburg.

Ecstatic Archive is Marx’s sixth solo project with the Goodman Gallery. Marx’s work is shown regularly at international art fairs, held in numerous public and private art collections and was included on the South African pavilion at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Marx has been involved in the making of numerous public sculptures, including The World On Its Hind Legs, a collaboration with William Kentridge (Beverley Hills, LA), Vertical Aerial: JHB, (the Old Ford, Constitution Hill, Johannesburg), The Fire Walker, in collaboration with William Kentridge (Queen Elizabeth Bridge, Johannesburg) and Paper Pigeon, in collaboration with Maja Marx (Pigeon Square, Johannesburg). In 2018 Marx participated in the third season at the Centre for the Less Good Idea with his project Vehicle, in collaboration with musicians Shane Cooper and Kyle Shepherd. Vehicle is scheduled to form part of the Holland Festival in June 2019.
He has extensive experience in theatre, as a scenographer, director, filmmaker and playmaker, including REwind: A Cantata for Voice, Tape and Testimony (directed by Marx, interactive film by Gerhard Marx and Maja Marx, composed by Philip Miller), performed at the Royal Festival Hall, Southbank, London (2010), the Market Theatre, Johannesburg (2008) and the 62’Centre, William College, Massachusetts (2007).

Marx is a fellow of the Sundance Film Institute, the Annenberg Fund and of the Ampersand Foundation.

Mikhael Subotzky

Mikhael Subotzky (b. 1981, Cape Town) is a Johannesburg based artist whose works in multiple mediums (including film installation, video, photography, collage and painting) attempt to engage critically with the instability of images and the politics of representation. Subotzky has exhibited in a series of important international exhibitions, including most recently Inheritance: Recent Video Art from Africa at the Fowler Museum (UCLA) in Los Angeles (2019) and Ex Africa in various venues in Brazil (2017-18). His award-winning Ponte City project (co-authored with Patrick Waterhouse) was presented at Art Basel Unlimited in 2018. The full exhibition and archive of this project has since been acquired by the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and will be the subject of a monographic exhibition there in the fall of 2020.

Subotzky’s work is collected widely by international institutions, including the Museum of Modern Art (New York), Solomon R Guggenheim Museum (New York), the National Gallery of Art (Washington), Tate (London), Centre Pompidou (Paris), and the South African National Gallery, among others.

Subotzky’s work was included in the Lubumbashi (2013) and Liverpool (2012) biennials. Pixel Interface, a multi-component video installation, was included in All The World’s Futures, curated by Okwui Enwezor at the 56th Venice Biennale (2015).

Misheck Masamvu

Part of Zimbabwe’s ‘born-free generation’, Misheck Masamvu (b. 1980 in Penhalonga, Zimbabwe) explores and comments on the socio-political setting of post-independence Zimbabwe, and draws attention to the impact of economic policies that sustain political mayhem. Masamvu raises questions and ideas around the state of ‘being’ and the preservation of dignity. His practice encompasses drawing, painting and sculpture.

Misheck Masamvu studied at Atelier Delta and Kunste Akademie in Munich, where he initially specialised in the realist style, and later developed a more avant-garde expressionist mode of representation with dramatic and graphic brushstrokes. His work deliberately uses this expressionist depiction, in conjunction with controversial subject matter, to push his audience to levels of visceral discomfort with the purpose of accurately capturing the plight, political turmoil and concerns of his Zimbabwean subjects and their experiences. His works serve as a reminder that the artist is constantly socially-engaged and is tasked with being a voice to give shape and form to a humane sociological topography. Masamvu will be taking part in the 22nd Biennale of Sydney in 2020.

Masamvu’s work has been well-received and exhibited in numerous shows including Armory Show 2018, Art Basel 2018, Basel Miami Beach 2017, 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair New York 2016, São Paulo Biennale 2016, and the Venice Biennale, Zimbabwe Pavillion 2011.

William Kentridge

William Kentridge’s work has been seen in museums and galleries around the world since the 1990s, including Documenta in Kassel, Germany (1997, 2003, 2012), the Museum of Modern Art in New York (1998, 2010), the Albertina Museum in Vienna (2010), Jeu de Paume in Paris (2010), and the Musée du Louvre in Paris (2010), where he presented Carnets d’Egypte, a project conceived especially for the Egyptian Room. Kentridge’s production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute was presented at Theatre de la Monnaie in Brussels, Festival d’Aix, and in 2011 at La Scala in Milan, and his production of Shostakovich’s The Nose was seen at The New York Metropolitan Opera in 2010 and again in 2013, travelling to Festival d’Aix and to Lyon in 2011. The five-channel video and sound installation The Refusal of Time was made for Documenta (13) in Kassel, Germany, in 2012; since then it has been seen at MAXXI in Rome, the Metropolitan Museum, New York, and other cities including Boston, Perth, Kyoto, Helsinki and Wellington. A substantial survey exhibition of Kentridge’s work opened in Rio de Janeiro in 2012, going on in following years to Porto Alegre, São Paulo, Bogota, Medellin, and Mexico City. In the summer of 2014 Kentridge’s production of Schubert’s Winterreise opened at the Vienna Festival, Festival d’Aix, and Holland Festival. In the fall it opened at the Lincoln Center in New York. Paper Music, a concert of projections with live music by Philip Miller, opened in Florence in September 2014, and was presented at Carnegie Hall in New York in late October 2014. Both the installation The Refusal of Time and its companion performance piece Refuse the Hour were presented in Cape Town in February 2015. More recently, Kentridge’s production of the Alban Berg opera Wozzeck premiered at the Salzburg Festival in 2017, and last year his acclaimed performance project The Head & The Load opened at Tate Modern in London, and travelled to Park Avenue Armory in December 2018. In June 2019, A Poem That I Used To Know opened at Kunstmuseum, Basel in Switzerland. This comprehensive survey show includes early drawings, major film installations, sculpture and two new pieces, an installation and a film, produced by Kentridge in response to works in the museum’s permanent collection.

In 2010, Kentridge received the prestigious Kyoto Prize in recognition of his contributions in the field of arts and philosophy. In 2011, he was elected as an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and received the degree of Doctor of Literature honoris causa from the University of London. In 2012, Kentridge presented the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University and was elected member of the American Philosophical Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Also in that year, he was awarded the Dan David Prize by Tel Aviv University, and was named as Commandeur des Arts et Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication. In 2013, William Kentridge was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts by Yale University and in 2014 received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Cape Town.

Upcoming News and Projects

Why Should I Hesitate, a major survey show, divided across the Norval Foundation and Zetiz MOCAA, is to opened in late August 2019 and will run until March 2020. Kentridge’s new opera project, Waiting for the Sibyl, will premiere at Teatro dell’Opera di Roma in September 2019. Waiting for the Sibyl was created in response to Alexander Calder’s Work in Progress, the only operatic work created by Calder and staged at the Opera in Rome in 1968. These two works will be performed consecutively at the Teatro Costanzi as the joint presentation, Calder/Kentridge. Performances will take place from 10 – 15 September, 2019.

Kiluanji Kia Henda

Kiluanji Kia Henda (b. 1979 in Luanda, Angola) employs a surprising sense of humour in his work, which often hones in on themes of identity, politics, and perceptions of postcolonialism and modernism in Africa. Practicing in the fields of photography, video, and performance, Kia Henda has tied his multidisciplinary approach to a sharp sense of criticality. A profound springboard into this realm comes from growing up in a household of photography enthusiasts. Furthermore, his conceptual edge has been sharpened by immersing himself in music, avantgarde theatre, and collaborating with a collective of emerging artists in Luanda’s art scene. In complicity with historical legacy, Kia Henda realises the process of appropriation and manipulation of public spaces and structures, and the different representations that form part of collective memory, as a relevant complexion of his aesthetical construction.

His solo exhibitions have been held in galleries and institutions around the world. His work has featured on biennales in Venice, Dakar and São Paulo as well as major travelling exhibitions such as Making Africa: A Continent of Contemporary Design and The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Hell, Purgatory revisited by Contemporary African Artists.

Kia Henda currently lives and works between Luanda and Lisbon.

Sam Nhlengethwa

Sam Nhlengethwa was born in the mining community of Payneville Springs in 1955 and grew up in Ratanda location in Heidelberg, east of Johannesburg. He completed a two-year Fine Art Diploma at the Rorkes Drift Art Centre in the late 1970s. While he exhibited extensively both locally and abroad during the 1980s and ’90s, Nhlengethwa’s travelling solo show South Africa, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow in 1993 established him at the vanguard of critical consciousness in South Africa and he went on to win the Standard Bank Young Artist Award in 1994.

Nhlengethwa was born into a family of jazz lovers; his two brothers both collected jazz music and his deceased eldest brother was a jazz musician. “Painting jazz pieces is an avenue or outlet for expressing my love for the music,” he once said in an interview. "As I paint, I listen to jazz and visualise the performance. Jazz performers improvise within the conventions of their chosen styles. In an ensemble, for example, there are vocal styles that include freedom of vocal colour, call-and-response patterns and rhythmic complexities played by different members. Painting jazz allows me to literally put colour onto these vocal colours.

“Jazz is rhythmic and it emphasises interpretation rather than composition. There are deliberate tonal distortions that contribute to its uniqueness. My jazz collages, with their distorted patterns, attempt to communicate all of this. As a collagist and painter, fortunately, the technique allows me this freedom of expression… What I am doing is not new though, as there are other artists before me who painted jazz pieces. For example, Gerard Sekoto, Romare Bearden and Henri Matisse.”

Nhlengethwa’s work has been included in key exhibitions such as Seven Stories About Modern Art in Africa at the Whitechapel Gallery in London and major publications such as Phaidon’s The 20th Century Art Book. He has had several solo shows in South Africa and abroad, exhibiting in the 12th International Cairo Biennale (2010) and in Constructions: Contemporary Art from South Africa at Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Niteroi (2011) in Brazil. In 2018 Nhlengethwa was included on the group exhibition Beyond Borders: Global Africa at the University of Michigan Museum of Art.

Walter Oltmann

Born in 1960 in Rustenburg, Gauteng, South Africa, Walter Oltmann’s main area of focus is sculpture, and more particularly in fabricating woven wire forms, which sometimes reference local craft traditions. He has researched and written on the use of wire in African material culture in this region and is deeply interested in the influence of these traditions in contemporary South African art. He has had numerous solo exhibitions with the Goodman Gallery, and has created several large-scale commissions for venues such as the Zeitz Sculpture Garden in Segera, Kenya.

Gerald Machona

Gerald Machona is a Zimbabwean born Visual artist with a Master’s Degree in Fine Art from Rhodes University and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Cape Town, completed at the Michaelis School of fine art. Machona’s work has been included on several prominent international exhibitions, which include the South African Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale in Italy, All the World’s Futures and at the 20th Biennale of Sydney, The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed. Machona’s work has also appearedin exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum in New York and at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa in Cape Town.

Machona works with sculpture, performance, new media, photography and film. The most notable aspect of his work is his innovative use of currency—particularly decommissioned Zimbabwean dollars—as an aesthetic material. Machona’s current work engages with issues of migration, transnationalism, social interaction and xenophobia in Africa.

In 2013, Machona featured in Mail and Guardian’s 200 Young South African’s supplemental and was selected by Business Day and the Johannesburg Art Fair in 2011 as one of the top ten young African artists practicing in South Africa. In 2019 Machona was included on the group exhibition Still Here Tomorrow to High Five You Yesterday at Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town.

Kudzanai Chiurai

Kudzanai Chiurai (b. 1981) is an internationally acclaimed young artist born in Zimbabwe. Born one year after Zimbabwe’s emergence from white-ruled Rhodesia, Chiurai’s early work has focused on the political, economic and social strife in his homeland however, his art practice spans a diverse range of media.

From large mixed media works and paintings that tackle some of the most pertinent issues facing Southern Africa such as xenophobia, displacement and black empowerment, Chiurai’s artworks confront viewers with the psychological and physical experience of inner-city environments of African metropolitans, seeing these spaces as the continent’s most cosmopolitan melting pots in which thousands of refugees and asylum-seekers who battle for survival alongside the never-ending swell of newly urbanized denizens. As an increasingly important figure in contemporary African art, Chiurai has expanded his art and activist practice to include photography and video: mediums that enable the artist to address pertinent issues facing his generation of southern Africans.

Chiurai has held numerous solo exhibitions since 2003 and has participated in various local and international exhibitions, such as ‘Figures & Fictions: Contemporary South African Photography’ (2011) at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London and ‘Impressions from South Africa, 1965 to Now’ (2011) at the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Other notable exhibitions include ‘The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory and Hell Revisited’ curated by Simon Njami at Museum für Moderne Kunst in Frankfurt (2014) and SCAD Museum of Art, Savannah USA (2015), as well as ‘Art/Afrique, Le nouvel atelier’ (2017) at the Fondation Louis Vuitton in Paris and ‘Regarding the Ease of Others’ (2017) at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa.

His Conflict Resolution series was exhibited at dOCUMENTA (13) (2012) in Kassel and the film Iyeza was one of the few African films to be included in the New Frontier shorts programme at the Sundance Film Festival in 2013. Chiurai has held numerous solo exhibitions with Goodman Gallery and has edited four publications with contributions by leading African creatives.

At present, the artist lives and works in Harare, Zimbabwe.

Ernesto Neto

Ernesto Neto (b. 1964, Rio de Janeiro) explores constructions of social space and the natural world by inviting physical interaction and sensory experience. Drawing from Biomorphism and minimalist sculpture, along with Neo-concretism and other Brazilian vanguard movements of the 1960s & 70s, the artist both references and incorporates organic shapes and materials – spices, sand and shells among them—that engage all five senses, producing a new type of sensory perception that renegotiates boundaries between artwork and viewer, the organic and manmade, the natural, spiritual and social worlds.

Neto’s work has been the subject of major museum exhibitions worldwide. In 2011, Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey in Mexico opened the artist’s first survey exhibition, La lengua de ernesto: retrospectiva 1987-2011, which travelled to Antiguo Colegio de San Ildefonso in Mexico City in 2013. The artist also presented important solo exhibitions at the Nasher Sculpture Center in Dallas (2012), Faena Arts Center in Buenos Aires, which traveled to Estação Leopoldina in Rio de Janeiro (2011-2012), Hayward Gallery, Southbank Centre in London (2010) Museum of Modern Art in New York (2010); Astrup Fearnley Museum of Modern Art in Oslo (2010), Sao Paulo Museum of Modern Art (2010), Museo d’Arte Contemporanea Roma in Italy (2008), Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney, Australia (2002), and the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. (2002), among others.

In 2001 Neto represented Brazil at the 49th Venice Biennale, and in 2017 Neto was prominently featured in Vive Arte Viva at the 57th Venice Biennale curated by Christine Macel. Neto’s work has also been featured in numerous group exhibitions and biennials, most recently the 14th Biennale de Lyon, curated by Emma Lavigne (2017), Manifesta 7 (2015), along with 2017 group shows at Guggenheim Bilbao, Albright Knox Art Gallery, Centre Pompidou-Metz, and a permanent installation at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago. In 2018, a large installation GaiaMotherTree was shown at the Zurich train station, in collaboration with Fondation Beyeler, with  a month-long corresponding public and education program that took place inside the work.

Neto’s work is extremely well represented in international museum collections, including those of the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Tate Gallery in London, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York, Carnegie Museum of Art in Pittsburgh, Museum Boijmans van Beuningen in Rotterdam, Centre Pompidou in Paris, Hara Museum in Tokyo, Contemporary Art Center of Inhotim in Brazil, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C., Milwaukee Art Museum, Museum of Contemporary Art, Los Angeles, among many others.

Neto studied at Rio de Janeiro’s Escola de artes visuais do Parque Lage in 1994 and in 1997, and also attended the Sao Paulo Museum of Modern Art from 1994 to 1996.

Neto lives and work in Brazil