William Kentridge / That Which We Do Not Remember

William Kentridge / That Which We Do Not Remember
30 November - 13 January 2018
Installation View
William Kentridge
Ampersand, 2017
Bronze
Work: 85 x 82 x 54 cm Weight 87 kg
William Kentridge
Ring, 2017
Bronze
Work: 70 x 89 x 72 cm Weight 123 kg
William Kentridge
The Flood, 2016
Relief printed from 11 woodblocks on Somerset Velvet, Soft White, 300 gsm. Final work comprised of 15 individual sheets adhered by 30 aluminum pins
Work: 181 x 213 cm Frame: 195.9 x 227.7 x 8.2 cm
William Kentridge
Lampedusa, 2017
Relief, printed from 12 woodblocks on Somerset Velvet, Soft White, 300 gsm. Final work comprised of 28 individual sheets adhered by 47 Aluminum pins.
Work: 207  x 119 cm Frame: 221 x 134 x 8.2 cm
William Kentridge
Refugees (You will find no other seas), 2017
Lift Ground Aquatint etching on 100% Hemp Phumani handmade paper, Mounted on raw cotton cloth
Work: 169 x 243 cm
William Kentridge
Untitled (Lexicon), 2017
Lithograph on 300g Velin d'Arches
135.5 x 99.5cm
William Kentridge
Drawing for Love Songs from the Last Century, 2017
Charcoal and collage on paper
100 x 500 cm
William Kentridge
Fill, 2017
Bronze
Work: 84.5 x 80 x 44 cm Weight 112 kg
William Kentridge
Lulu, 2016
Linocut with hand painting on Hannemuhle 300 gsm
52 x 52.5 cm
William Kentridge
Lulu, 2015
Linocut on Somerset Soft White 300gm
63 x 49 cm
in collaboration with Marguerite Stephens
Mme. Manet, 2017
Hand-woven mohair tapestry
Work: 216 x 158 cm
William Kentridge
Skeletal Horse, 2017
Lift Ground Aquatint etching on 100% Hemp Phumani handmade paper, Mounted on raw cotton cloth
163.5 x 153 cm
William Kentridge
Countess Geschwitz, 2016
Linocut on Hahnemuhle 300gsm
59.3 x 42.8cm
William Kentridge
Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 35), 2016
Charcoal and red pencil on Hahnemuhle paper
Work: 121 x 160 cm
William Kentridge
That Which I Do Not Remember, 2017
Relief, printed from 12 woodblocks on Somerset Velvet, Soft White, 300 gsm. Final work comprised of 28 individual sheets adhered by 47 Aluminum pins.
209.3 x 199.5 cm (edges irregular)
in collaboration with Marguerite Stephens
M. Manet, 2017
Hand-woven mohair tapestry
Work: 200 x 150 cm
William Kentridge
Right Into Her Arms, 2016
Model theatre with projected HD video, drawings props, software and circuitry, electronic components, wood, steel, cardboard, found paper and found objects 300 x 244 x 125 cm
300 x 244 x 125 cm
William Kentridge
Mantegna, 2016-2017
Relief printed from 13 woodblocks and one linoleum block on Somerset Velvet, Soft White, 300 gsm. Final work comprised of 21 individual sheets adhered by 37 Aluminum pins
Work: 200 x 200 cm Frame: 209 x 210 x 8.2 cm
William Kentridge
Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 30), 2016
Charcoal and red pencil on Hahnemuhle paper
57 x 78cm
William Kentridge
Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 15), 2017
Charcoal on paper
Triptych: Approx 54 x 78 cm each
William Kentridge
Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 5), 2016
Charcoal and red pencil on Velin Arches Cover White (440gsm)
121 x 160cm
William Kentridge
Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 14), 2016
Charcoal and red pencil on Hahnemuhle paper
60 x 80 cm
William Kentridge
Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 6), 2016
Charcoal and red pencil on Velin Arches Cover White (440gsm)
Work: 121 x 160 cm
William Kentridge
Bunch of Flowers in a Vase, 2017
Lithographic print on Korean paper
169 x 128cm
William Kentridge
Triumph of Bacchus, 2016
Lift Ground Aquatint etching on 100% Hemp Phumani handmade paper, Mounted on raw cotton cloth
164 x 153,5 cm
William Kentridge
Marcus Aurelius, 2016
Lift Ground Aquatint etching on 100% Hemp Phumani handmade paper, Mounted on raw cotton cloth
163 x 156 cm
William Kentridge
Garibaldi, 2016
Lift Ground Aquatint etching on 100% Hemp Phumani handmade paper, Mounted on raw cotton cloth
157,5 x 147,5 cm
William Kentridge
Blue Rubrics , 2017
Lapis Lazuli pigment prints on found Latin Thesaurus paper, Set of 16
Work: 44 x 53 cm
William Kentridge
Miniature theater model for Lulu, 2017


William Kentridge / That Which We Do Not Remember - Installation View

30 November - 13 January 2018

William Kentridge

Ampersand

William Kentridge

Ring

William Kentridge

The Flood

William Kentridge

Lampedusa

William Kentridge

Refugees (You will find no other seas)

William Kentridge

Untitled (Lexicon)

William Kentridge

Drawing for Love Songs from the Last Century

William Kentridge

Fill

William Kentridge

Lulu

William Kentridge

Lulu

in collaboration with Marguerite Stephens

Mme. Manet

William Kentridge

Skeletal Horse

William Kentridge

Countess Geschwitz

William Kentridge

Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 35)

William Kentridge

That Which I Do Not Remember

in collaboration with Marguerite Stephens

M. Manet

William Kentridge

Right Into Her Arms

William Kentridge

Mantegna

William Kentridge

Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 30)

William Kentridge

Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 15)

William Kentridge

Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 5)

William Kentridge

Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 14)

William Kentridge

Untitled (Drawing from Wozzeck 6)

William Kentridge

Bunch of Flowers in a Vase

William Kentridge

Triumph of Bacchus

William Kentridge

Marcus Aurelius

William Kentridge

Garibaldi

William Kentridge

Blue Rubrics

William Kentridge

Miniature theater model for Lulu

Goodman Gallery Cape Town
30 November 2017 – 13 January 2018

That Which We Do Not Remember marks the year-end at Goodman Gallery Cape Town. This solo exhibition presents major new work by William Kentridge, spanning two recent opera productions, Lulu and Wozzeck, and several projects in between.

The exhibition gives unique insight into Kentridge’s prolific practice and intricately interconnected projects over the past two years, bringing together drawings, prints, sculpture, tapestries, a kinetic model theatre as well as a 360° virtual reality film – many of which are rooted in Kentridge’s distinctive charcoal drawing. While some works will debut in South Africa, others have recently shown abroad and will be accessible to local audiences for the first time.

At the centre of the show is a series of charcoal drawings made by Kentridge for his production of Alban Berg’s opera, Wozzeck, which premiered at the Salzburg Festival in July. The opera delves into the tormented life of a homicidal soldier and is characterised by bleak landscapes, denuded of their trees and scarred by shell craters.

As Wozzeck ’s creative director, Kentridge drew inspiration from documentary photographs that depict the ravaged battlefields of Flanders. For Kentridge, an opera must ‘meet a material for it to take fire – with Wozzeck, it’s the roughness of charcoal drawing. So all of the projections are made out of charcoal drawings and there’s something in the graininess of the drawing itself that echoes the music, but also with the world that it’s depicting – of things transforming, of sounds under the earth.’

The title of the exhibition is drawn from one of a new series of prints, titled Blue Rubrics (a continuation of Kentridge’s 2012 Rubrics print series). Here, ‘rubric’ refers to instructions printed in prayer books, conventionally in red ink. However, in this instance, words and phrases are printed in striking lapis lazuli-based pigment. Kentridge perceives these phrases as ‘a prod, a goad to the activity of thinking, of understanding how we have to make sense of the world from contradictory fragments.’

Marking Kentridge’s first foray into 360° virtual reality medium, Love Songs from the Last Century is experienced by donning a headset and exploring a panoramic charcoal landscape over which phrases, silhouettes and props are maneuvered. The experience is punctuated by animated live action manipulations. Kentridge is a looming presence who precipitates a fall of black snow, which takes the form of torn tissue paper that flutters towards the floor. The work was produced for the Invisible Exhibition, which formed part of Season Two at the Centre for the Less Good Idea in Johannesburg earlier this year.

The exhibition expands on an area of intellectual curiosity that is central to Kentridge’s practice, namely unpacking and challenging the concept of a ‘polished’ and ‘complete’ creative idea realised in the form of a ‘finished’ artwork. In this vein, a series of hand-carved wooden busts are presented, appearing as if they could be preparatory to a woodcut print, however, in this instance, that which would be used to produce an artwork becomes the artwork itself. The busts depict founding members of the African National Congress in 1912, including John Dube and Pixely Kaseme, as well as characters from the Berg opera Lulu, which Kentridge directed in 2016. Also on show is a series of prints related to Lulu in which the artist explores the femme fatale construct together with other characters from the opera.

That Which We Do Not Remember extends into the Video Room with the kinetic model theatre Right Into Her Arms, assembled from film material made while developing the production of Lulu. The soundtrack samples fragments of Schoenberg and Webern cabaret songs, as well as Swedish cabaret recordings of the same era and spoken excerpts from Kentridge’s recording of Kurt Schwitter’s Ursonate, which was performed live in New York for Performa 17.

William Kentridge lives and works in Johannesburg. Since the 1990s, his work has been exhibited in museums and galleries around the world and is held in eminent collections, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Albertina Museum in Vienna and the Musée du Louvre in Paris. Kentridge has participated in the Venice Biennale (1993, 1995, 2005) as well as Documenta X (1997), Documenta XI (2002) and Documenta XIII (2012), among others. His opera productions have been staged at venues such as La Scala in Milan and Lincoln Center and Carnegie Hall, both in New York, and in collaboration with opera companies such as the Dutch National Opera in Amsterdam, the English National Opera in London, and the New York Metropolitan Opera. This year Kentridge ranked 58th on Art Review’s Power 100 and was the recipient of Spain’s prestigious Princess of Asturias Award for Art. He premiered Wozzeck at the 2017 Salzburg Festival and, concurrent to his Goodman Gallery exhibition, Kentridge has solo shows at The Museo Nacional Centro de Arte Reina Sofia in Madrid and at Sint-Janshospitaal in Bruges.

William Kentridge

William Kentridge’s work has been seen in museums and galleries around the world since the 1990s, including Documenta in Kassel, Germany (1997, 2003, 2012), the Museum of Modern Art in New York (1998, 2010), the Albertina Museum in Vienna (2010), Jeu de Paume in Paris (2010), and the Musée du Louvre in Paris (2010), where he presented Carnets d’Egypte, a project conceived especially for the Egyptian Room. Kentridge’s production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute was presented at Theatre de la Monnaie in Brussels, Festival d’Aix, and in 2011 at La Scala in Milan, and his production of Shostakovich’s The Nose was seen at The New York Metropolitan Opera in 2010 and again in 2013, travelling to Festival d’Aix and to Lyon in 2011. The five-channel video and sound installation The Refusal of Time was made for Documenta (13) in Kassel, Germany, in 2012; since then it has been seen at MAXXI in Rome, the Metropolitan Museum, New York, and other cities including Boston, Perth, Kyoto, Helsinki and Wellington. A substantial survey exhibition of Kentridge’s work opened in Rio de Janeiro in 2012, going on in following years to Porto Alegre, São Paulo, Bogota, Medellin, and Mexico City. In the summer of 2014 Kentridge’s production of Schubert’s Winterreise opened at the Vienna Festival, Festival d’Aix, and Holland Festival. In the fall it opened at the Lincoln Center in New York. Paper Music, a concert of projections with live music by Philip Miller, opened in Florence in September 2014, and was presented at Carnegie Hall in New York in late October 2014. Both the installation The Refusal of Time and its companion performance piece Refuse the Hour were presented in Cape Town in February 2015. More recently, Kentridge’s production of the Alban Berg opera Wozzeck premiered at the Salzburg Festival in 2017, and last year his acclaimed performance project The Head & The Load opened at Tate Modern in London, and travelled to Park Avenue Armory in December 2018. In June 2019, A Poem That I Used To Know opened at Kunstmuseum, Basel in Switzerland. This comprehensive survey show includes early drawings, major film installations, sculpture and two new pieces, an installation and a film, produced by Kentridge in response to works in the museum’s permanent collection.

In 2010, Kentridge received the prestigious Kyoto Prize in recognition of his contributions in the field of arts and philosophy. In 2011, he was elected as an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and received the degree of Doctor of Literature honoris causa from the University of London. In 2012, Kentridge presented the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University and was elected member of the American Philosophical Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Also in that year, he was awarded the Dan David Prize by Tel Aviv University, and was named as Commandeur des Arts et Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication. In 2013, William Kentridge was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts by Yale University and in 2014 received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Cape Town.

Upcoming News and Projects

Why Should I Hesitate, a major survey show, divided across the Norval Foundation and Zetiz MOCAA, is to open in late August 2019 and run until March 2020. Kentridge’s new opera project, Waiting for the Sibyl, will premiere at Teatro dell’Opera di Roma in September 2019. Waiting for the Sibyl was created in response to Alexander Calder’s Work in Progress, the only operatic work created by Calder and staged at the Opera in Rome in 1968. These two works will be performed consecutively at the Teatro Costanzi as the joint presentation, Calder/Kentridge. Performances will take place from 10 – 15 September, 2019.