Misheck Masamvu / Still Still / 2016

Misheck Masamvu / Still Still / 2016
15 September - 20 October 2016
Installation View
Misheck Masamvu
Lost Angels, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 230 x 160 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Pinky, 2016
Oil on canvas
72 x 71 cm
Misheck Masamvu
First Lady, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 72 x 65 x 2 cm Frame: 75 x 67.5 x 4.8 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Lady parts on the Coat of Arms, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 178 x 171 x 2.5 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Saint Ant, 2016
Oil on canvas
130 x 150 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Hood Poison, 2015
Oil on canvas
Work: 140 x 255 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Heavy Weight Champion, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 170 x 260 x 2.5 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Ranked Heads, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 175 x 245 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Dozen Pizza Slices, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 163 x 170 x 2.5 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Amen! Amen! Amen!, 2012
Oil on canvas
Work: 127 x 113 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Life of the hair, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 73 x 65 x 2.5 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Jump spread your legs, 2013
Oil on canvas
Work: 188 x 350 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Allergies, 2016
Oil on canvas
Work: 157 x 130 x 2.5 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Monkey Rains, 2016
Oil on Canvas
Work: 149 x 130 x 2.5 cm

Misheck Masamvu / Still Still / 2016 - Installation View

15 September - 20 October 2016

Misheck Masamvu

Lost Angels

Misheck Masamvu

Pinky

Misheck Masamvu

First Lady

Misheck Masamvu

Lady parts on the Coat of Arms

Misheck Masamvu

Saint Ant

Misheck Masamvu

Hood Poison

Misheck Masamvu

Heavy Weight Champion

Misheck Masamvu

Ranked Heads

Misheck Masamvu

Dozen Pizza Slices

Misheck Masamvu

Amen! Amen! Amen!

Misheck Masamvu

Life of the hair

Misheck Masamvu

Jump spread your legs

Misheck Masamvu

Allergies

Misheck Masamvu

Monkey Rains

Goodman Gallery Cape Town
15 September – 20 October 2016

In Misheck Masamvu’s solo exhibition Still Still, the painter expands on a body of work begun in Still at Goodman Gallery Johannesburg from earlier in 2016. The title of the show reflects repetition as a crucial reflex for Masamvu, with motifs and marks being replicated over and over. It is both a nod to the previous exhibition and a statement of progress; the artist growing what he terms his ‘grammar’, through seemingly indefatigable reiterations. This grammar comprises expressive brushwork, chaotic compositions and perpetually altered or mutated figures that he often depicts between states of animal and human.

As a resident Zimbabwean, Masamvu’s work is inevitably situated within the socio-economic realities of living in a failed system. The human figure is found in a space of limbo; subject to an unstable environment and in varying states of distress or transition. The artist, however, rails against an overt political reading in his work: “I think what I find quite sad is the idea of politics being pushed in as part of the content. I’m not saying politics are not important but are more of an element within everything else. What really shapes the whole narrative in my work is surviving the politics but not talking about the politics.”

It is in the personal that Masamvu invests his thematic weight, indicated initially in the darkly humorous and reflective titles he gives his works. He speaks of each painting as a proposal for a new reality, an arena for him to work through personal hopes and frustrations but also to offer alternatives, for himself and others, to the constraints and constructs of daily reality. Masamvu states, “My work does not have a specific location, it doesn’t have a specific background.” There is a sense that he is inviting the viewer to attempt to place themselves in that undefined and disorienting space.
Masamvu uses colour atypically to achieve that disorientation. In the catalogue to the group show Working Title, held at Goodman Gallery Johannesburg in 2012, critic Sean O’Toole writes that the painter “purposefully uses colours in ways that destabilize their fixed metonymic qualities… it can even be a way to impede a viewer’s entry into a painting.” Contradiction and contrast operate at every level of Masamvu’s works in Still Still. Line is obfuscated by repetitive mark-making and then clarified in a series of accompanying drawings, figures are deformed then ultimately reconstituted, and overarching all this is a constant pull between representation and abstraction.

Misheck Masamvu was born in Penhalonga, Zimbabwe in 1980 and currently lives and works in Harare where he also facilitates and mentors the work of peers and aspiring artists. He trained at Atelier Delta, Harare and Kunste Akademie in Munich, Germany. He has participated in many major exhibitions and events including the 54th Venice Biennale, where he represented Zimbabwe, as well as the Sao Tome and Dakar Biennales. His work was included on the Cape Town leg of New Revolutions, a group show looking back on 50 years of the Goodman Gallery.

Misheck Masamvu

Part of Zimbabwe’s ‘born-free generation’, Misheck Masamvu (b. 1980 in Penhalonga, Zimbabwe) explores and comments on the socio-political setting of post-independence Zimbabwe, and draws attention to the impact of economic policies that sustain political mayhem. Masamvu raises questions and ideas around the state of ‘being’ and the preservation of dignity. His practice encompasses drawing, painting and sculpture.

Misheck Masamvu studied at Atelier Delta and Kunste Akademie in Munich, where he initially specialised in the realist style, and later developed a more avant-garde expressionist mode of representation with dramatic and graphic brushstrokes. His work deliberately uses this expressionist depiction, in conjunction with controversial subject matter, to push his audience to levels of visceral discomfort with the purpose of accurately capturing the plight, political turmoil and concerns of his Zimbabwean subjects and their experiences. His works serve as a reminder that the artist is constantly socially-engaged and is tasked with being a voice to give shape and form to a humane sociological topography.

Masamvu’s work has been well-received and exhibited in numerous shows including Armory Show 2018, Art Basel 2018, Basel Miami Beach 2017, 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair New York 2016, São Paulo Biennale 2016, and the Venice Biennale, Zimbabwe Pavillion 2011.