BASIC REALITY / 2011

BASIC REALITY / 2011
04 September - 09 October 2011
Installation View
Monique Pelser
Thirty-two bullets , 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Monique Pelser
Photograph of police dog, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Monique Pelser
Passing out, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26cm
Thabiso Sekgala
Semotlhase, former Bophuthatswana, 2009
Color photograph on fibre paper
Work: 32 x 32 cm Frame: 49 x 49 x 3.5 cm

Inside Outside , 2011
Oil, acrylic on canvas
50x50 cm

Moving Past, 2011
Relief print on semi-transparent paper chine colle on Hahnemühle Copperplate
54 x 78.5 cm
Tiffany Mentoor
Untitled (Speaker box), 2010
Wood, plaster, automotive paint, speakers
95 x 70 x 33 cm
Monique Pelser
Parade formal footwear, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Peter-Mikael Campbell
Steeped in Burning Flowers, 2011
Concrete, mineral crystallization and time.

Thabiso Sekgala
Thembi Mathebula or Nzimande, Siyabuswa, former Kwandebele, 2011
Color photograph on fibre paper
Image: 90 x 90 cm Frame: 113.5 x 113.5 x 3 cm

Inqaba, 2011
Wearable Art Piece
165 x140cm
Monique Pelser
One new South African flag, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Monique Pelser
The Holy Bible (El-Paso leather ankle), 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm

Indoda, 2011



Inqaba, 2011
Wearable Art Piece
165 x140cm
Samantha Hill
Tell Me What to Swallow, 2009

Variable

Inqaba, 2011


Monique Pelser
City of Johannesburg , 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Monique Pelser
Six plated t-spoons in a blue leather box, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
Pankop, Passage dividing primary and high school, former Kwandebele, 2009
Color photograph on fibre paper
60 x 60 cm
Jacques du Toit
Die Oertel Wat My Pla, 2011

Variations in dimensions and content
Jacques du Toit
Haainrieg Tomidaakis in Studio, 2010
Archival Print on cotton rag paper
61x28 cm-framed
Murray Kruger
Carpet No 1: ‘Open tent for contemplating the cosmic origins of art’, 2011
Performance
Variable
Monique Pelser
A pipe smoking set, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
Mawilli Thubane, Loding, former Kwandebele, 2009
Color photograph on fibre paper
Image: 60 x 60 x 3.5 cm Frame: 84 x 84 cm
Monique Pelser
Six Stars, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26cm
Monique Pelser
Suspenders, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Jacques du Toit
Haainrieg Tomidaakis se Stories Vol.3, 2010


Quinten Edward Williams
Overhauls Engine,
Acrylic on Wall
Dimensions Variable
Gerald Machona
Afronaut’s Right Boot (Prototype 1), 2011
Silicone, ZWD currency, cloth
33 x 10 x 8cm
Monique Pelser
Pair of leather gloves, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink
18 x 26 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
Nklele Machika or Mary Koketse, Sehoko, former Bophuthatswana, 2010
Color photograph on fibre paper
30x30 cm

BASIC REALITY / 2011 - Installation View

04 September - 09 October 2011

Monique Pelser

Thirty-two bullets

Monique Pelser

Photograph of police dog

Monique Pelser

Passing out

Thabiso Sekgala

Semotlhase, former Bophuthatswana

Inside Outside

Moving Past

Tiffany Mentoor

Untitled (Speaker box)

Monique Pelser

Parade formal footwear

Peter-Mikael Campbell

Steeped in Burning Flowers

Thabiso Sekgala

Thembi Mathebula or Nzimande, Siyabuswa, former Kwandebele

Inqaba

Monique Pelser

One new South African flag

Monique Pelser

The Holy Bible (El-Paso leather ankle)

Indoda

Inqaba

Samantha Hill

Tell Me What to Swallow

Inqaba

Monique Pelser

City of Johannesburg

Monique Pelser

Six plated t-spoons in a blue leather box

Thabiso Sekgala

Pankop, Passage dividing primary and high school, former Kwandebele

Jacques du Toit

Die Oertel Wat My Pla

Jacques du Toit

Haainrieg Tomidaakis in Studio

Murray Kruger

Carpet No 1: ‘Open tent for contemplating the cosmic origins of art’

Monique Pelser

A pipe smoking set

Thabiso Sekgala

Mawilli Thubane, Loding, former Kwandebele

Monique Pelser

Six Stars

Monique Pelser

Suspenders

Jacques du Toit

Haainrieg Tomidaakis se Stories Vol.3

Quinten Edward Williams

Overhauls Engine

Gerald Machona

Afronaut’s Right Boot (Prototype 1)

Monique Pelser

Pair of leather gloves

Thabiso Sekgala

Nklele Machika or Mary Koketse, Sehoko, former Bophuthatswana

BASIC REALITY

Text by Katrin Lewinsky

The art exhibition Basic Reality is not a curated exhibition. As the artistic
positions existed prior to the invitation, it is the artists’ present context that
relates to this exhibition. The exhibiting group of South African artists provide
examples of contemporary art mainly produced in South Africa between
2010-2011. The exhibition exists alongside current creative processes and
contributes to their development within a public interface. It is at the same
time to be seen as a medium in itself, created and completed by the artists.
This exhibition is unique and can’t be repeated. Goodman Gallery takes the
position of a commercial production partner offering the artists advice and
curatorial dialogue.
In this sense Basic Reality is a conceptual exhibition. It is formulating a liberal
progress of reference for contemporary art. It contains a neutral perspective
towards the possibilities of exchange between the media art and public in
order to relate to and establish processes of reality.
In the following conceptual text a theory on reality is introduced as part of a
greater philosophical discourse and as a consideration for statements on
contemporary art, like this exhibition. For the interest of relating to the artists
and the exhibited artwork outside of the theoretical concept on reality, selfreferential
artistic statements form a main component of this exhibition.
…………
Theoretical text as a philosophical background and basis of discussion
The world can be seen as completely catalogued and analysed and then,
almost as compensation, artificially regenerated as if this were the reality. And
it is by these artificial strategies that we, all being specimen of ethnology,
here, in a metropolis, in all forms of society, try to live with representations of
reality. This common state assumes that none of our societies know how to
manage their social self, their power, their reality.
In this sense, the real that we experience is not reality. A basis for the
development of various structures: a growth of the true, of the lived
understanding for anthropological structures such as religion, technology,
language etc. There is a utopian culture that is conditional to human
awareness of, for example, a return of the metaphorical without object and
substance; of creations of idealistic models such as melancholy, of myths of
origin and signs of reality; of truth, objectivity and established authenticity.
Furthermore, a frantic production of the real and the referential exists, greater
than and similar to the madness of material production. We create visible
continua, visible myths of origin as existential evidence for the ultimate belief.
We correlate to productions of systems, commodities, of political economy
and of over-production. This is the restitution of the real that society has
developed to remove itself from. This is a hyperreality.
This hyperreality implicates an anti-form to every principle and objective.
And thus also to an interesting current principle in our society: the code of
capital. Capital is a challenge to society. It was capital that was the first to
feed, throughout history, on the destruction of every referential, of every
human goal, which crushed every ideal separation of the good and the truth
and their counterparts in order to establish a radical law of equivalence and
exchange, its law of power. It was the first to practice abstraction, severance,
deterritorialisation, etc. If capital has generated reality, its reality principle
exterminates the use of value, of real equivalence, of production and wealth.
In this system another evaluating strategy is simultaneously manifested:
power. This capacity shall be mentioned here as for a certain period it has the
disposition to assemble only signs of an affinity and the figure of a collective
demand for its signs. Those signs are equivalent to a setting, which is not a
principle, and more substantially not an ideology, as ideology does not relate
to reality or power, only to its infidelity.
Reality is evident in modes of power, as it is real in anything that is situational.
While ideology aims to restore the objective process, especially those of
common standards, this causes pretentious problems with restoring the truth
beneath a setting. This dynamic leads to the reason why power is so in
agreement with ideological discourses, for these are all discourses of truth
that always establish a good and avant-garde quality.
Art, and contemporary art in this context, of the matter of reality and its
structures of acceptance, manipulation and anticipation in our society, has
the power to create realities. In the existing scenarios art is closer to reality
than any other form of artificial production. Art inherently expresses critical
conditions, abstraction and redemption of the status quo. As a creative selfreferential
system it is not dependant on any form of power, reality, hyper
structure and capital, on any existential and ethnological conditions. Art has
thus by its immanent reduced artificial conditions, have the ability to settle the
basic conditions of the society to participate and create reality. Every art
exhibition is an opportunity to experience the visualised expressions of this
basic reality.

Thabiso Sekgala

Thabiso Sekgala (b. 1981 in Johannesburg, South Africa) was a photographer whose work explored themes of abandonment, memory, spatial politics and concept of home.

‘In photography I am inspired by looking at human experience whether lived or imagined,’ Sekgala once expressed. ‘Images capture our history and who we are, our presence and absence. Growing up in both rural and urban South Africa influences my work. The dualities of these both environments inform the stories I am telling through my photographs, by engaging issues around land, peoples’ movement, identity and the notion of home.’

Sekgala held solo exhibitions in South Africa and Europe and exhibited in group shows internationally, including Les Rencontres D’Arles, LagosPhoto Festival and Bamako Biennale. In 2013 he had residencies in both the Kunsterhaus Bethanien, Berlin, and at HIWAR/Durant Al Funun, Jordan.

He studied at Johannesburg’s Market Photo Workshop from 2007 to 2008 and was awarded the Tierney Fellowship in 2010.

Sekgala died in Johannesburg in 2014.

Gerald Machona

Gerald Machona is a Zimbabwean born Visual artist with a Master’s Degree in Fine Art from Rhodes University and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Cape Town, completed at the Michaelis School of fine art. Machona’s work has been included on several prominent international exhibitions, which include the South African Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale in Italy, All the World’s Futures and at the 20th Biennale of Sydney, The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed. Machona’s work has also appearedin exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum in New York and at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa in Cape Town.

Machona works with sculpture, performance, new media, photography and film. The most notable aspect of his work is his innovative use of currency—particularly decommissioned Zimbabwean dollars—as an aesthetic material. Machona’s current work engages with issues of migration, transnationalism, social interaction and xenophobia in Africa.

In 2013, Machona featured in Mail and Guardian’s 200 Young South African’s supplemental and was selected by Business Day and the Johannesburg Art Fair in 2011 as one of the top ten young African artists practicing in South Africa. In 2019 Machona was included on the group exhibition Still Here Tomorrow to High Five You Yesterday at Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town.