The Marks We Make / 2010
21 January - 11 February 2010
Installation View
The Marks We Make / 2010
21 January - 11 February 2010
Installation View
The Marks We Make / 2010
21 January - 11 February 2010
Installation View
The Marks We Make / 2010
21 January - 11 February 2010
Installation View
The Marks We Make / 2010
21 January - 11 February 2010
Installation View
The Marks We Make / 2010
21 January - 11 February 2010
Installation View
Jaco Spies
A woven landscape: Errata, 2010
Ink transfer, charcoal and oil on Fabriano paper


Estate I,


1
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Line Drawing V, 2009
Pen on paper
13 x 9
Diane Victor
Dustman, 2010
Dust on paper
150 x 94.5 cm
Broomberg & Chanarin
Red House #15, 2006
C-type print
152 x 122 cm (165 x 135 x 6 framed)
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing VII, 2009
Ink on paper
14 x 15 cm
Justin Brett
Nightswimmer, 2010

201 x 75.3 cm (drawing) 300 x 110 x 66 cm (sculpture)
Brett Murray
Working Drawing III, 2006
Ink on paper
48 x 65

Rek jou Bek I,


1
Ryan Arenson
Untitled Drawing II, 2009
Pencil on paper
65 x 50.5 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Line Drawing I, 2009
Pen on paper
17 x 24 cm
Broomberg & Chanarin
Red House #2, 2006
C-type print
100 x 76 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing VIII, 2009
Ink on paper
13 x 12
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Line Drawing VI, 2009
Pen on paper
13 x 9 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing, 2009
Ink on paper
19.5 x 22.5

Rek jou Bek II,


1
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing IX, 2009
Ink on paper
18.5 x 20 cm
Sue Williamson
Graves of the Cradock Four, 1989
Print from a lost drawing made in situ in Cradock in 1989
83 x 60.5 cm
Ryan Arenson
Untitled Drawing III, 2009
Pencil on paper
65 x 50.5 cm
Jaco Spies
A Woven Landscape with Clay Ox and Dolosse, 2009
Charcoal on Fabriano paper
Work: 70 x 100 cm
Brett Murray
Working Drawing IV, 2006
Ink on paper
42 x 59 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Line Drawing VII, 2009
Pen on paper
9.5 x 7 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Untitled III (Mining Series), 2009
Charcoal on paper
25 x 26 cm
Kathryn Smith
Psychogeographies: 24 Cromwell Street; Heather/Fred/Rose, 2008
Solid-cast lead with letterpress
approx. 9 x 9 x 9 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Line Drawing II, 2009
Pen on paper
16.5 x 21 cm
Claire Gavronsky
Run with the hare, hunt with the hounds, 2009
White pastel crayon on paper
200 x 200 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing II, 2009
Ink on paper
21.5 x 22.5

Estate II,


1
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing V, 2009
Ink on paper
16 x 16 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Untitled I (Mining Series), 2009
Charcoal on paper
25 x 26 cm
Belinda Blignaut
Cinderella is pissed, 2010
Chappies, bubblegum and saliva

Jeremy Wafer
Wing, 2010
Site specific pencil and varnish drawing on wall
130 x 340 cm
Ryan Arenson
Untitled Drawing IV, 2009
Pencil on paper
65 x 50.5 cm (both)

Face Book II,


1
Walter Battiss
Papeete, 1972
Ink on paper
41 x 59 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing X, 2009
Ink on paper
19 x 19 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Line Drawing III, 2009
Pen on paper
13 x 9
William Kentridge
Suite Of 9 small drawings for artists book BREATHE, 2008
Indian Ink on pages of Russian encyclopedia
36 x 46.5 cm each
Walter Oltmann
Children, 2010
Aluminium wire
220 x 220 cm
Robert Hodgins
An Arcadian park scene, 2009
Watercolor on paper
53.5 x 84 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing III, 2009
Ink on paper
14.5 x 16.5
David Koloane
Smoky City Scape II, 2008
Mixed Media On Paper
87.5 x 189cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing XI, 2009
Ink on paper
17 x 14.5 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Line Drawing IV, 2009
Pen on paper
13 x 9 cm
Gerhard Marx
Aggregate II, 2010
Cut and reconstituted map fragments
80 x 78 cm
Brett Murray
Working Drawing II, 2006
Ink on paper
48 x 65
Deborah Bell
Luminousness, 2010
Mixed media on paper
158 x 121 cm
Jonah Sack
The land of the voice, 2010
installation with drawing and books

Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing IV, 2009
Ink on paper
16 x 17 cm
Robert Hodgins
A little god scrambling for white prayers, 2009
Watercolor on paper
100 x 80 cm
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing VI, 2009
Ink on paper
12.5 x 12 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Untitled II (Mining Series), 2009
Charcoal on paper
25 x 26 cm
Ryan Arenson
Untitled Drawing, 2009
pencil on paper
65 x 50.5 cm

Face Book I,


1
Alexandra Makhlouf
Untitled Ink Drawing XII, 2009
Ink on paper
13 x 15.5 cm

D-light, 1999
Mixed Media
29.5 x 21 cm
Jonah Sack
Fynbosboek, 2009
Brush and ink on paper
102 x 410 cm
William Kentridge
Construction for Return (Return), 2008
Paper, Indian ink, printed pages, collage, wooden sticks, wooden board, adhesive tape, glue

The Marks We Make / 2010 - Installation View

21 January - 11 February 2010

The Marks We Make / 2010 - Installation View

21 January - 11 February 2010

The Marks We Make / 2010 - Installation View

21 January - 11 February 2010

The Marks We Make / 2010 - Installation View

21 January - 11 February 2010

The Marks We Make / 2010 - Installation View

21 January - 11 February 2010

The Marks We Make / 2010 - Installation View

21 January - 11 February 2010

Jaco Spies

A woven landscape: Errata

Estate I

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Line Drawing V

Diane Victor

Dustman

Broomberg & Chanarin

Red House #15

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing VII

Justin Brett

Nightswimmer

Brett Murray

Working Drawing III

Rek jou Bek I

Ryan Arenson

Untitled Drawing II

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Line Drawing I

Broomberg & Chanarin

Red House #2

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing VIII

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Line Drawing VI

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing

Rek jou Bek II

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing IX

Sue Williamson

Graves of the Cradock Four

Ryan Arenson

Untitled Drawing III

Jaco Spies

A Woven Landscape with Clay Ox and Dolosse

Brett Murray

Working Drawing IV

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Line Drawing VII

Sam Nhlengethwa

Untitled III (Mining Series)

Kathryn Smith

Psychogeographies: 24 Cromwell Street; Heather/Fred/Rose

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Line Drawing II

Claire Gavronsky

Run with the hare, hunt with the hounds

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing II

Estate II

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing V

Sam Nhlengethwa

Untitled I (Mining Series)

Belinda Blignaut

Cinderella is pissed

Jeremy Wafer

Wing

Ryan Arenson

Untitled Drawing IV

Face Book II

Walter Battiss

Papeete

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing X

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Line Drawing III

William Kentridge

Suite Of 9 small drawings for artists book BREATHE

Walter Oltmann

Children

Robert Hodgins

An Arcadian park scene

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing III

David Koloane

Smoky City Scape II

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing XI

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Line Drawing IV

Gerhard Marx

Aggregate II

Brett Murray

Working Drawing II

Deborah Bell

Luminousness

Jonah Sack

The land of the voice

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing IV

Robert Hodgins

A little god scrambling for white prayers

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing VI

Sam Nhlengethwa

Untitled II (Mining Series)

Ryan Arenson

Untitled Drawing

Face Book I

Alexandra Makhlouf

Untitled Ink Drawing XII

D-light

Jonah Sack

Fynbosboek

William Kentridge

Construction for Return (Return)

Ryan Arenson | Walter Battiss | Deborah Bell | Justin Brett | Lisa Brice | Adam Broomberg & Oliver Chanarin | Adam Broomberg | Kudzanai Chiurai | Marlene Dumas | Claire Gavronsky | Robert Hodgins | William Kentridge | David Koloane | Moshekwa Langa | Alexandra Makhlouf | Brett Murray | Sam Nhlengethwa | Walter Oltmann | Jonah Sack | Kathryn Smith | Jaco Spies | Clive Van Den Berg | Diane Victor | Jeremy Wafer | Sue Williamson

For many artists, drawing forms part of a larger process – a loose way of visualizing an artwork before committing to it in a more permanent medium. But the act of drawing itself remains one of the oldest and most eloquent forms of artistic expression. Goodman Gallery Cape is proud to present a group exhibition of drawings entitled ‘The Marks We Make’, exploring notions of mark-making as assertions of ownership and expressions of violence, memory and play.

Drawing usually refers to pencil marks on paper. In this exhibition we approach the term more loosely, featuring a range of media to question what constitutes a drawing and what gives it power. Works will include photographs from the Red House series by Adam Broomberg and Oliver Chanarin, depicting the marks left behind by prisoners of Saddam Hussein in Iraq; wire and sculptural elements by Walter Oltmann and William Kentridge; installations by Jeremy Wafer, Jonah Sack and Justin Brett, as well as more traditional pencil, oil and charcoal drawings by Sue Williamson, Lisa Brice and Sam Nhlengethwa.

‘The Marks We Make’ brings together South African artists to explore the ways in which marks shape our environments and inform our perspectives. Bodies are circumscribed, silenced or marginalized by the invasive marks of violence. But these marks can also be used to express an identity, stake out a position or form communities. Territory is claimed, land contested, and ownership asserted through the use of marks, both physical and symbolic. The exhibition seeks to interrogate the ways in which these marks act to create the contingent, political spaces within which we form ourselves, and the role they play in shaping our personal and cultural memories.

Brett Murray

Brett Murray studied at the University of Cape Town where he was awarded his Master’s of Fine Arts degree in 1988 with distinction. The title of his dissertation is ‘A Group of Satirical Sculptures Examining Social and Political Paradoxes in the South African Context’. As an undergraduate he won Irma Stern Scholarships in both 1981 and 1982. He won the Simon Garson Prize for the most Promising student in 1982 and was awarded the Michaelis Prize in 1983. As a postgraduate student he received a Human Sciences Research Council bursary, a University of Cape Town Research Scholarship, the Jules Kramer Grant and an Irma Stern Scholarship.

He has exhibited extensively in South Africa and abroad. From 1991 to 1994 he established the sculpture department at the University of Stellenbosch, where he curated the show ‘Thirty Sculptors from the Western Cape’ in 1992. In 1995 he curated, with Kevin Brand, ‘Scurvy’, at the Castle of Good Hope in Cape Town. That year he co-curated ‘Junge Kunst Aus Zud Afrika’ for the Hänel Gallery in Frankfurt, Germany.

In 1999, Brett co-founded, with artists and cultural practitioners Lisa Brice, Kevin Brand, Bruce Gordon, Andrew Putter, Sue Williamson, Robert Weinek and Lizza Littlewort, ‘Public Eye’, a Section 27 company that manage and initiate art projects in the public arena with the aims to develop a greater profile for public art in Cape Town. They have initiated projects on Robben Island, worked with the cities health officials on aids awareness campaigns and initiated outdoor sculpture projects including ‘The Spier Sculpture Biennale’. He curated ‘Homeport’ in 2001 which saw 15 artists create site specific text based works in Cape Town’s waterfront precinct. Public Eye have interfaced with cultural funding bodies as consultants and hosted multi-media events across the city.

Murray was included on the Cuban Biennial of 1994, and subsequently his works where exhibited at the Ludwig Museum of Contemporary Art in Germany. He was included on the group show, ‘Springtime in Chile’ at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Santiago, Chile. He was also part of the travelling show ‘Liberated Voices, Contemporary Art From South Africa’ which opened at the Museum for African Art in New York in 1998. His work formed part of the shows ‘Min(d)fields’ at the Kunsthaus in Baselland, Switzerland in 2004 and ‘The Geopolitics of Animation‘ at the Centro Andaluz de Arte Contemporaneo in Seville in Spain in 2007. He won the Cape Town Urban Art competition in 1998 that resulted in the public work ‘Africa’, a 3.5 metre bronze sculpture, being erected in Cape Town’s city centre. He won, with Stefaans Samcuia, the commission to produce an 8 × 30 meter wall sculpture for the foyer of the Cape Town International Convention Centre in 2003. In 2007 he completed ‘Specimens’, a large wall sculpture for the University Of Cape Town’s medical school campus. In 2011 he produced the public artwork ‘Seeds’ for The University of Bloemfontein and in 2013 he was commissioned to produce the 7 meter bronze ‘Citizen’ for the Auto & General Park in Johannesburg.

His solo shows include: ‘White Boy Sings the Blues’ at the Rembrandt Gallery in Johannesburg in 1996, ‘I love Africa’ at the Bell-Roberts Gallery in Cape Town in 2000, ‘Us and Them’ at the Axis Gallery in New York in 2003 and ‘Sleep Sleep’ at the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg in 2006. His solo show, ‘Crocodile Tears’, was held at both the Cape Town and Johannesburg branches of The Goodman Gallery in 2007 and 2009. His recent show, ‘Hail To The Thief’, was first held at the Goodman Gallery in Cape Town in 2010, and then at the Goodman Gallery in Johannesburg in 2012. He was nominated as the Standard Bank Young Artist of the year in 2002.

Sue Williamson

Sue Williamson (b. 1941, Lichfield, UK) emigrated with her family to South Africa in 1948. Trained as a printmaker, Williamson also works in installation, photography and video. In the 1970s, she started to make work which addressed social change during apartheid and by the 1980s Williamson was well known for her series of portraits of women involved in the country’s political struggle. A Few South Africans is one such a series where she celebrates women who had played roles in the fight for freedom.

Referring to her practice, Williamson states: “You become aware of the audience to whom you speak. In that sense, you think backwards: what you have to say, whom you say it to, and how it will reach the audience. Having to consider your work through the eyes of somebody who knows nothing about you as an artist and what you are doing is a useful exercise.” Williamson has managed to avoid the rut of being caught in an apartheid-era aesthetic, “I am never particularly interested in doing what I did the last time. I take one thing and work it out a number of ways.”

In 2018, Williamson was Goodman Gallery’s featured artist at the FNB Joburg Art Fair, where she exhibited her work Messages from the Atlantic Passage, a large-scale installation of shackled, suspended glass bottles engraved with profiles of 19th-century victims of slavery. This installation was also exhibited that year at Art Basel in Switzerland and at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India.

Williamson’s works feature in numerous public collections across the globe, including those at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA, Tate Modern, London, UK, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA, Wifredo Lam Centre, Havana, Cuba, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa, and Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa.

Williamson has received various awards and fellowships such as the Bellagio Creative Arts Fellowship 2011, Italy, Rockefeller Foundation, the Visual Artist Research Award Fellowship 2007, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA and the Lucas Artists Residency Fellowship 2005, Montalvo Art Center, California, USA.

Sue Williamson lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa.

William Kentridge

William Kentridge’s work has been seen in museums and galleries around the world since the 1990s, including Documenta in Kassel, Germany (1997, 2003, 2012), the Museum of Modern Art in New York (1998, 2010), the Albertina Museum in Vienna (2010), Jeu de Paume in Paris (2010), and the Musée du Louvre in Paris (2010), where he presented Carnets d’Egypte, a project conceived especially for the Egyptian Room. Kentridge’s production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute was presented at Theatre de la Monnaie in Brussels, Festival d’Aix, and in 2011 at La Scala in Milan, and his production of Shostakovich’s The Nose was seen at The New York Metropolitan Opera in 2010 and again in 2013, traveling to Festival d’Aix and to Lyon in 2011. The 5-channel video and sound installation The Refusal of Time was made for Documenta (13) in Kassel, Germany, in 2012; since then it has been seen at MAXXI in Rome, the Metropolitan Museum, New York, and other cities including Boston, Perth, Kyoto, Helsinki and Wellington. A substantial survey exhibition of Kentridge’s work opened in Rio de Janeiro in 2012, going on in following years to Porto Alegre, São Paulo, Bogota, Medellin, and Mexico City. In the summer of 2014 Kentridge’s production of Schubert’s Winterreise opened at the Vienna festival, Festival d’Aix, and Holland Festival. In the fall it opened at the Lincoln Center in New York. Paper Music, a concert of projections with live music by Philip Miller, opened in Florence in September 2014, and was presented at Carnegie Hall in New York in late October 2014. Both the installation The Refusal of Time and its companion performance piece Refuse the Hour were presented in Cape Town in February 2015. More recently, Kentridge’s production of the Alban Berg opera Wozzeck premiered at the Salzburg Festival in 2017, and earlier this year his latest performance project The Head & The Load opened at Tate Modern in London, and will travel to Park Avenue Armory in December 2018.

In 2010, Kentridge received the prestigious Kyoto Prize in recognition of his contributions in the field of arts and philosophy. In 2011, he was elected as an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and received the degree of Doctor of Literature honoris causa from the University of London. In 2012, Kentridge presented the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University and was elected member of the American Philosophical Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Also in that year, he was awarded the Dan David Prize by Tel Aviv University, and was named as Commandeur des Arts et Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication. In 2013, William Kentridge was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts by Yale University and in 2014 received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Cape Town.

Upcoming News and Projects

In 2019, Kentridge’s celebrated production of the Alban Berg opera Wozzeck will run for seven performances at the Sydney Opera House from 25 January to 15 February. A major museum survey show at Kunstmuseum Basel, opening 8 June until 13 October. In the second-half of the year there will be a major Kentridge exhibition across two venues in Cape Town: Zeitz MOCAA and the Norval Foundation.

Broomberg & Chanarin

Adam Broomberg (born 1970, Johannesburg, South Africa) and Oliver Chanarin (born 1971, London, UK) are artists living and working between London and Berlin. They are professors of photography at the Hochschule für bildende Künste (HFBK) in Hamburg and teach on the MA Photography & Society programme at The Royal Academy of Art (KABK), The Hague which they co-designed. Together they have had numerous solo exhibitions most recently at The Centre Georges Pompidou (2018) and the Hasselblad Center (2017). Their participation in international group shows include the Yokohama Trienniale (2017), Documenta, Kassel (2017), The British Art Show 8 (2015-2017), Conflict, Time, Photography at Tate Modern (2015); Shanghai Biennale (2014); Museum of Modern Art, New York (2014); Tate Britain (2014), and the Gwanju Biennale (2012). Their work is held in major public and private collections including Pompidou, Tate, MoMA, Yale, Stedelijk, V&A, the Art Gallery of Ontario, Cleveland Museum of Art, and Baltimore Museum of Art. Major awards include the ICP Infinity Award (2014) for Holy Bible, and the Deutsche Börse Photography Prize (2013) for War Primer 2. Broomberg and Chanarin are the winners of the Arles Photo Text Award 2018 for their paper back edition of War Primer 2, published by MACK.

Gerhard Marx

Gerhard Marx (b. South Africa, 1976) develops his projects through an engagement with pre-existent conventions and practices. This process entails careful acts of dissection and rearrangement, which allow Marx to engage the poetic potential and philosophical assumptions of his chosen material, developing original drawing, sculptural and performative languages. Marx completed his undergraduate degree at the Michaelis School of Fine Art, UCT and received his MA (Fine Art) (Cum Laude) from Wits School of Art, Johannesburg.

Ecstatic Archive is Marx’s sixth solo project with the Goodman Gallery. Marx’s work is shown regularly at international art fairs, held in numerous public and private art collections and was included on the South African pavilion at the 2013 Venice Biennale. Marx has been involved in the making of numerous public sculptures, including The World On Its Hind Legs, a collaboration with William Kentridge (Beverley Hills, LA), Vertical Aerial: JHB, (the Old Ford, Constitution Hill, Johannesburg), The Fire Walker, in collaboration with William Kentridge (Queen Elizabeth Bridge, Johannesburg) and Paper Pigeon, in collaboration with Maja Marx (Pigeon Square, Johannesburg). In 2018 Marx participated in the third season at the Centre for the Less Good Idea with his project Vehicle, in collaboration with musicians Shane Cooper and Kyle Shepherd. Vehicle is scheduled to form part of the Holland Festival in June 2019.
He has extensive experience in theatre, as a scenographer, director, filmmaker and playmaker, including REwind: A Cantata for Voice, Tape and Testimony (directed by Marx, interactive film by Gerhard Marx and Maja Marx, composed by Philip Miller), performed at the Royal Festival Hall, Southbank, London (2010), the Market Theatre, Johannesburg (2008) and the 62’Centre, William College, Massachusetts (2007).

Marx is a fellow of the Sundance Film Institute, the Annenberg Fund and of the Ampersand Foundation.

Sam Nhlengethwa

Born in Springs, South Africa in 1955. Lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa.Nhlengethwa was born into a family of jazz lovers; his two brothers both collected jazz music and his deceased eldest brother was a jazz musician. “Painting jazz pieces is an avenue or outlet for expressing my love for the music,” he once said in an interview. "As I paint, I listen to jazz and visualise the performance. Jazz performers improvise within the conventions of their chosen styles. In an ensemble, for example, there are vocal styles that include freedom of vocal colour, call-and-response patterns and rhythmic complexities played by different members. Painting jazz allows me to literally put colour onto these vocal colours.

“Jazz is rhythmic and it emphasises interpretation rather than composition. There are deliberate tonal distortions that contribute to its uniqueness. My jazz collages, with their distorted patterns, attempt to communicate all of this. As a collagist and painter, fortunately, the technique allows me this freedom of expression… What I am doing is not new though, as there are other artists before me who painted jazz pieces. For example, Gerard Sekoto, Romare Bearden and Henri Matisse.”

Walter Oltmann

Born in 1960 in Rustenburg, Gauteng, South Africa, Walter Oltmann’s main area of focus is sculpture, and more particularly in fabricating woven wire forms, which sometimes reference local craft traditions. He has researched and written on the use of wire in African material culture in this region and is deeply interested in the influence of these traditions in contemporary South African art. He has had numerous solo exhibitions with the Goodman Gallery, and has created several large-scale commissions for venues such as the Zeitz Sculpture Garden in Segera, Kenya.

Diane Victor

Diane Victor (b. 1964 in Witbank, South Africa) has established herself as a major figure in the South African and International art communities and is renowned for her expert printmaking and draughtsmanship. Victor positions herself within the South African art scene through her bold confrontations with difficult and at times taboo subject matter. Her large scale drawings and etchings demonstrate a command of mark-making, which she uses to render her subjects in affecting detail. At times, her work seems to pose challenges to social and political life in contemporary South Africa, considering issues of corruption, violence and an unequal power distribution.

Having received her BA Fine Arts Degree from the University of the Witwatersrand, with a major in Printmaking, and graduating with distinction – Victor has gone on to win various prestige awards including the Sasol New Signatures Award in 1987. In 1988, Victor became the youngest recipient of the prestigious Volkskas Atelier Award which granted her a ten-month stay at the Cité Internationale des Artes in Paris, France. Over this period, Victor was able to work collaboratively with other experienced printmakers and to observe and reflect on a society very different from her own.

Victor has exhibited at numerous venues around South Africa and internationally, some of which include the UNISA Gallery, Fried Contemporary, MoMA New York, Faulconer Gallery, The Highpoint Center for printmaking, The Gus Fisher Gallery, National Museum of Contemporary Art Oslo, Yale University Art Gallery, The Contemporary Museum Honolulu, and Australia and Adelaide Central Gallery. Victor’s work is part of a number of important collections, including Sasol, Pretoria Art Museum, Johannesburg Art Gallery, Durban Art Museum and Santam.

Since 1990, Victor has been a lecturer, teaching Fine Art, at various South African institutions including the University of Pretoria, Tshwane University of Technology, Open Window Academy, the University of the Witwatersrand, Rhodes University and the University of Johannesburg.

Victor lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa. At present, she is a senior Fine Art lecturer at the University of Pretoria’s Department of Visual Art.

Jeremy Wafer

Born in Durban, South Africa in 1953. Lives and works in Johannesburg, South Africa

Jeremy Wafer was born in Durban in 1953, grew up in Nkwalini, Zululand, and studied at the University of Natal, Pietermaritzburg (B.A.F.A.1979) and at the University of the Witwatersrand (B.A. Hons. in Art History 1980 and M.A. Fine Art 1987). He has taught since 1982 in the Fine Art Departments of the Technikon Natal and the Technikon Witwatersrand before being appointed Associate Professor in the School of Arts of the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg from 2004 where he is currently Head of the Department of Fine Art and History of Art. He has exhibited regularly in South Africa and abroad. His work is represented in the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institute, Washington DC, the South African National Gallery, the Johannesburg Art Gallery and in many other museum, private and corporate collections.

Claire Gavronsky

(b. 1957, Johannesburg)

Claire Gavronsky works in a variety of mediums, most notably in painting and sculpture. Her work often uses visual reference’s to historical paintings, and cues are sometimes taken from events from everyday life. Memory, racism, violence against women and children are some of the theme’s which run through her oeuvre. Her work also bridge’s sometimes complex narratives through overlaid images, and stories which link the past to the present.

In 1981 Gavronsky received a Master of Fine Art in painting, and she moved to Italy in 1985 and has since lived between Cape Town and Tuscany.

In Florence, Gavronsky established, with fellow artist Rosemarie Shakinovsky, an international artist’s residency workshop in Tuscany. After the success of these workshops they founded workshops in Cape Town, Johannesburg, Venda and Botswana. Gavronsky and Shakinovsky often collaborate under the name Rosenclaire. They also collaborate on occasion with William Kentridge. She has exhibited extensively in South Africa, Europe and the United States of America.