Selected Works

TRI (blue and white), 2018
Shadecloth, steel frame, paint
Work: 180 x 110 x 40 cm
Flowers for Africa: Libya, 2017
Flowers, vase, protocol allowing reactivation, with certificate signed by the artist
Variable Dimensions
Flowers for Africa: Namibia, 2017
Flowers, protocol allowing reactivation, with certificate signed by the artist
Variable Dimensions
Flowers for Africa: Union of South Africa, 2017
Flowers, protocol allowing reactivation, with certificate signed by the artist
Variable Dimensions
Hazy (Blue), 2018
Shade Cloth, wood, fluorescent light
Work: 31 x 132 x 21 cm
Black S-Twist, 2018
Shadecloth, wood, fluorescent light
Work: 121 x 139 x 21 cm
Subduction Study #1, 2015
Folded pigment print on paper 285g
Work: 68 x 85 cm
Subduction Study #2, 2015
Folded pigment print on paper 285g
Work: 70 x 90 cm
Subduction Study #4, 2017
Folded pigment prints on paper 285g
Work: 71 x 79 cm
Desire Paths: Langa, 2017
Printed cotton fabric and steel mesh
Work: 150 x 240 cm
Desire Paths: Cape Flats, 2017
Printed cotton fabric and steel mesh
Work: 150 x 240 cm
Desire Paths: District Six, 2017
Printed cotton fabric and steel mesh
Work: 150 x 240 cm
Desire Paths: Soweto, 2017
Printed cotton fabric and steel mesh
Work: 150 x 240 cm
Rumours that Maji was a lie, 2014
Mixed media installation

Nursery, 2016
Plants, wood, oral transmissions
Variable Dimensions
Subduction Study #8, 2017
Folded pigment prints on paper 285g
Work: 65.5 x 73 cm

Biography

Kapwani Kiwanga studied anthropology and comparative religion at McGill University (Montreal, CA). She has followed the program “La Seine” at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris, and also works at Le Fresnoy (a french national center for contemporary art). She was artist in residence at the MU Foundation in Eindhoven (NL) and at the Box in Bourges (FR).

Working with sound, film, performance, and objects, Kapwani Kiwanga relies on extensive research to transform raw information into investigations of historical narratives and their impact on political, social, and community formation. The Paris-based artist’s work focuses on sites specific to Africa and the African diaspora, examining how certain events expand and unfold into popular and folk narratives, and revealing how these stories take shape in objects and oral histories. Trained as an anthropologist, Kiwanga performs this role in her artistic practice, using historical information to construct narratives about groups of people. Kiwanga is not only invested in the past but also the future, telling Afrofuturist stories and creating speculative dossiers from future civilizations to reflect on the impact of historical events.