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rosenclaire / re•collections / 2010

18 February - 13 March 2010
Goodman Gallery, Cape Town

Goodman Gallery Cape proudly presents the first solo exhibition by rosenclaire in South Africa for over twenty years. Working under the name rosenclaire, Rose Shakinovsky and Claire Gavronsky present a conversation between their respective and collective practices and identities in re.collections.

The show’s title refers to a collection of arbitrary objects and thoughts waiting to be re-ordered, renamed and remembered: a heterogeneous gathering. Across-pollination between the flea-market, the studio, art history and personal experience, the show is a juxtaposition of painting, drawing, sculpture and installation. rosenclaire refer to their work as context-specific, governed by implicit signification where the subject matter defines the choice of media and stylistic convention.

re.collections, implies a reference to collections, collecting, correcting, naming, renaming and reframing cultural constructs of art and artifice. Here Gavronsky’s remake of Goya’s caprices, complimented by her large paintings and bronze sculptures tease and taunt our notions of art and marketing the mark. Shakinovsky’s museum sleuthing and Brechtian interruptions dissolve the boundaries and transgress the borders between art and non-art. A video by Shakinovsky from an ongoing series of illicitly filmed museum walks, and a sound piece by rosenclaire complete this intervention. re.collections and its implications with regard to history and memory, both personal and political, are explored by Gavronsky, in a collapsing and enfolding of history, in which she presents Dante’s hell, side by side with the Beslan massacre of the innocents, in a series of large oil paintings.

Artworks

Ink on vintage paper
34.5 x 27.5 cm
Unavailable
Bronze
28 x 9.5 x 7.5 cm / Work: 28 x 9.5 x 7.5 cm
Bronze
28 x 9.5 x 7.5 cm / Work: 28 x 9.5 x 7.5 cm
Bronze
28 x 9.5 x 7.5 cm / Work: 28 x 9.5 x 7.5 cm
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
8.5 x 17.5 cm
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
11.5 x 17.5 cm
Ink on vintage paper
25.5 x 20.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
32 x 26 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
18 x 13.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
37 x 30 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
17.5 x 11 cm
Unavailable
Mixed media on paper
106.5 x 76.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
42 x 35.5 cm
Unavailable
40 dolls shoes and cutout
100 x 85 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
12.5 x 12.5 cm
Blackberry photographs
57 x 41 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
24 x 19.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
33.5 x 26 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
12 x 2.8 cm
Unavailable
Blackberry photographs
57 x 41 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
47.5 x 37 cm
Unavailable
Antique coffee plunger, satin box and ceramic bird on pedestal
Pedestal: 135 x 15 x 15 cm / Cylinder: 35.5 x 6 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
12.5 x 20.2 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
24 x 19.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
28.5 x 23.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
37.5 x 30 cm
Unavailable
Oil on cotton
120 x 100 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
16.7 x 17.5 cm
Ink on vintage paper
19.5 x 14 cm
Unavailable
Oil on cotton
160 x 115 cm
Unavailable
Magnifying glasses with photographs and CCTV
Dimensions variable
Unavailable
Oil on wooden bingo boards
16.5 x 14.5 cm (each panel)
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
13.8 x 21 cm
Oil paint on school slates
28 x 20 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
39.5 x 29.5 cm
Ink on vintage paper
32 x 27.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
Unavailable
Oil on linen
150 x 100 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
2.8 x 17.5 cm
Oil paint on school slates
22 x 16 cm
Unavailable
Oil on linen
180 x 140 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
17 x 22.5
Unavailable
Oil paint on school slates
28 x 20 cm
Unavailable
Oil on cotton
176 x 150 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
9 x 28 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint and mixed media
100 x 70 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on school slates
28 x 20 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
20.5 x 15.5 cm
Unavailable
Oil on cotton
170 x 200 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
8.7 x 17.5 cm
Oil paint on school slates
28 x 20 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
8.5 x 16.5 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint and correction tape on paper
100 x 70 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
38.5 x 32.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
34 x 28 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
14 x 21.5 cm
Unavailable
Watercolor and correction tape
100 x 700 (each)
Unavailable
Oil on linen
Work: 190 x 200 cm
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
10.5 x 17.5 cm
Bronze corners, each corner original
8.5 x 17 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
40.5 x 39.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
21 x 15.5 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
20.5 x 15.5 cm
Unavailable
Dry point etching
79 x 60.6 cm
Unavailable
Ink on vintage paper
39 x 29 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
10.5 x 18 cm
Oil on board and antique stethoscope
Ink on vintage paper
22 x 17.5 cm
Unavailable
Oil paint on bronze, each corner original
12 x 24.5 cm
Unavailable
Oil on linen, French curve and ludo dot
Work: 30 x 39  cm

About

 rosenclaire image

rosenclaire

Born in Johannesburg, South Africa. Live and work in Florence, Italy

rosenclaire’s collaborative work began in the mid 1980’s when they translocated from South Africa to Italy. Their artwork and teaching has always involved some form of political activism. Though very different in stylistic approach, their work shares the same concepts and common concerns. The collaborative work is generally context-specific.
rosenclaire exhibitions are therefore works in themselves where they both respond to a central concern and the show as a whole is designed as a cohesive installation.
They join forces in order to creatively facilitate a discourse pertaining to a specific theme, place or situation that they are invited to participate in. This may be a curated show, a public sculpture or a pedagogic intervention. Exhibitions often contain a live feed that both references surveillance but at the same time renders the audience as subject and content of the work. The work is done specifically for the conceptual task at hand where, as artists, they regain control and responsibility for generating a specific dialogue with both the art world and general public. An important permanent interactive installation called ‘Soapboxes’ of theirs, sits outside the South African National Gallery/IZIKO (SANG). They collaborate as wives and as dedicated mentors who have run a renowned artists residency program in Tuscany for the past 30 years. Each of them are artists in their own right and make work individually as well.

Gavronsky works in a variety of mediums, most notably in painting and sculpture. Her work often uses visual reference’s to historical paintings, and cues are sometimes taken from events from everyday life. Memory, racism, violence against women and children are some of the theme’s which run through her oeuvre. Her work also bridge’s sometimes complex narratives through overlaid images, and stories which link the past to the present.
In 1981 Gavronsky received a Master of Fine Art in painting, and she moved to Italy in 1985 and has since lived between Cape Town and Tuscany.

Shakinovsky’s work defies any stylistic category as it consists of work that ranges from the re-presentation and decontextualization of found objects, found images and found situations, to delicately painted abstractions and ironic bronzes. The work concerns itself with current political and social discourses while simultaneously referencing and reconstructing art historical edifices. Shakinovsky is interested in the structure as well as the morphology of all seemingly coherent visual and nonvisual languages from the prelinguistic to the post-linquistic and the digital. Her present research is concerned with discourses pertaining to the Posthuman, Postanthropos, Transhuman, Migration and the consequences of Climate Change.
Shakinovsky has over the past decade given contemporary art history courses to collectors, philanthropists and business leaders hoping to inspire them to contribute to fostering the arts in their respective countries.

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