[Working Title] / 2012

[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
[Working Title] / 2012
24 May - 30 June 2012
Installation View
Monique Pelser
A pipe smoking set, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
No Place Like This, Ghent, II, 2010
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
84 x 56 cm
Monique Pelser
One new South African flag, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Monique Pelser
Six plated t-spoons in a blue leather box, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Gabrielle Goliath
Berenice 10 - 28 , 2010
Pigment inks on cotton Baryta Gabrielle Goliath courtesy of Lunetta Bartz, MAKER, Johannesburg
108 x 75cm / Set of 18 photographs each measuring 108 x 75 cm
Gerald Machona
Bling Bling: Blood Diamond's Are A Girl's Best Friend, 2010
Decommissioned Zimbabwean and South African currency, lamp and plinth
variable
Monique Pelser
Conversations With My Father, 2009 -
Found photographs, archival prints, sound and video
variable
Thabiso Sekgala
No Place Like This, Ghent, III, 2010
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
84 x 56 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
Cheezy, 2012
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
Work: 60 x 60 cm
Monique Pelser
Parade formal footwear, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
Steam Iron, 2012
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
60 x 60 cm
Monique Pelser
City of Johannesburg , 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Reshma Chhiba
Linga-yoni, 2009
Steel frame, comforel, sari, thread, cotton and nylon cord
130 x 47 x 37cm
Monique Pelser
Six Stars, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26cm
Monique Pelser
Pair of leather gloves, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink
18 x 26 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
White Sheet Dreams, 2012
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
60 x 60 cm
Kyle Morland
Double Ended Saddle Cut, 2012
Mild steel, base and clearcoat with course silver
114 x 114 x 80cm
Reshma Chhiba
Kundalini Shakti, 2009
Kumkum and turmeric powder with thread and wool on canvas
120 x 100cm
Thabiso Sekgala
No Place Like This, Ghent, I, 2010
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
84 x 56 cm
Monique Pelser
Suspenders, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Monique Pelser
Dylan's Circus and I, 2012


Murray Kruger
Carpet No 1: ‘Open tent for contemplating the cosmic origins of art’, 2011
Performance
Variable
Monique Pelser
Photograph of police dog, 2011
Archival Pigment Ink Print
18 x 26 cm
Thabiso Sekgala
No Place Like This, Ghent, IV, 2010
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
84 x 56cm
Thabiso Sekgala
Fork Ever Alone, 2012
Inkjet print on satin semi-gloss archival paper
Work: 90 x 90 cm

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

[Working Title] / 2012 - Installation View

24 May - 30 June 2012

Monique Pelser

A pipe smoking set

Thabiso Sekgala

No Place Like This, Ghent, II

Monique Pelser

One new South African flag

Monique Pelser

Six plated t-spoons in a blue leather box

Gabrielle Goliath

Berenice 10 - 28

Gerald Machona

Bling Bling: Blood Diamond's Are A Girl's Best Friend

Monique Pelser

Conversations With My Father

Thabiso Sekgala

No Place Like This, Ghent, III

Thabiso Sekgala

Cheezy

Monique Pelser

Parade formal footwear

Thabiso Sekgala

Steam Iron

Monique Pelser

City of Johannesburg

Reshma Chhiba

Linga-yoni

Monique Pelser

Six Stars

Monique Pelser

Pair of leather gloves

Thabiso Sekgala

White Sheet Dreams

Kyle Morland

Double Ended Saddle Cut

Reshma Chhiba

Kundalini Shakti

Thabiso Sekgala

No Place Like This, Ghent, I

Monique Pelser

Suspenders

Monique Pelser

Dylan's Circus and I

Murray Kruger

Carpet No 1: ‘Open tent for contemplating the cosmic origins of art’

Monique Pelser

Photograph of police dog

Thabiso Sekgala

No Place Like This, Ghent, IV

Thabiso Sekgala

Fork Ever Alone

RESHMA CHHIBA / GABRIELLE GOLIATH / MURRAY KRUGER / GERALD MACHONA / KYLE MORLAND / MONIQUE PELSER / THABISO SEKGALA

Goodman Gallery Cape presents [Working Title] – a group exhibition of young artists working in South Africa, brought together in a way that allows multiple and perhaps surprising dialogues to emerge, and foregrounding questions of authorship, authority and notions of the relational.

Reshma Chhiba’s Kundalini Shakti and Linga-yoni – a slashed canvas and an unsettlingly organic sculpture, both informed by the artist’s ongoing interest in the Hindu goddess Kali as an embodiment of unbridled feminine creativity – act as a complement and counterpoint to the cool, Apollonian rationalism of Kyle Morland’s Double-Ended Saddle Cut, a suspended sculpture of welded steel. Both are also concerned, in different ways, with the act and effects of making. Murray Kruger, too, plays with concepts of creativity and authorship in his recreation of, and extrapolation from, Walter Battiss’ 1973 performance piece Open tent for contemplating the cosmic origins of art, while at the same time raising questions about the nature of the artwork, its evolution over time, and the ways in which its audiences are implicated in its inscription into history.

Gerald Machona’s origami-based installation Bling Bling: Blood diamonds are a girl’s best friend, a cynical comment on the abuses of power in postcolonial African politics, resonates with Monique Pelser’s Conversations with my Father, a searingly intimate attempt, in an installation and set of photographs, to understand her father’s death and life in the larger context of the dark and complex history of the South African police. A solemn photographic installation by Gabrielle Goliath titled Berenice 10-28 speaks poignantly of personal issues of loss and grief, while uncompromisingly confronting questions of violence and abuse in South African society.

Thabiso Sekgala’s photographs of the workers and inhabitants of a housing estate in Ghent are a refreshing and original take on the questions of identity that inform so much contemporary South African practice, and a provocative inversion of the usual dynamics of ‘othering’, while his stark images of domestic objects, at once intimate and abject, are a compelling reflection on contemporary urban life.

[Working Title] is a showcase of young artists whose work, while ranging in media and crossing disciplines, shares an uncommon and original approach to contemporary practice.

Thabiso Sekgala

Thabiso Sekgala (b. 1981 in Johannesburg, South Africa) was a photographer whose work explores themes of abandonment, memory, spatial politics and concept of home. ‘In photography I am inspired by looking at human experience whether lived or imagined,’ Sekgala once expressed. ‘Images capture our history and who we are, our presence and absence. Growing up in both rural and urban South Africa influences my work. The dualities of these both environments inform the stories I am telling through my photographs, by engaging issues around land, peoples’ movement, identity and the notion of home.’

Sekgala held solo exhibitions in South Africa and Europe and has exhibited in group shows internationally, including Les Rencontres D’Arles, LagosPhoto Festival and Bamako Biennale. In 2013 he had residencies in both the Kunsterhaus Bethanien, Berlin, and at HIWAR/Durant Al Funun, Jordan.

He studied at Johannesburg’s Market Photo Workshop in 2007 to 2008 and was awarded the Tierney Fellowship in 2010.

Sekgala died in Johannesburg in 2014.

Gabrielle Goliath

Gabrielle Goliath situates her practice within contexts marked by the traces, disparities and as-of-yet unreconciled traumas of colonialism and apartheid, as well as socially entrenched structures of patriarchal power and rape-culture. Enabling opportunities for affective, relational encounters, she seeks to resist the violence through which black, brown, feminine, queer and vulnerable bodies are routinely fixed through forms of representation.

Goliath has exhibited widely, most recently in the Future Generation Art Prize, Pinchuk Art Centre, Kiev; Conversations in Gondwana, São Paulo Cultural Center, São Paulo; Kubatana – An Exhibition with Contemporary African Artists, Vestfossen Kunstlaboratorium, Norway; Verbo Performance Art Festival, São Paulo, and the Palais de Tokyo’s Do Disturb Festival, Paris. She has won a number of awards including a Future Generation Art Prize/Special Prize (2019), the prestigious Standard Bank Young Artist Award (2019), as well as the Institut Français, Afrique en Créations Prize at the Bamako Biennale (2017). Her work features in numerous public and private collections, including the Tate Modern, the Iziko South African National Gallery, Johannesburg Art Gallery, and the Wits Art Museum. Goliath is currently a Ph.D. candidate with the Institute for Creative Arts at the University of Cape Town, South Africa.

www.gabriellegoliath.com

Gerald Machona

Gerald Machona is a Zimbabwean born Visual artist with a Master’s Degree in Fine Art from Rhodes University and a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Cape Town, completed at the Michaelis School of fine art. Machona’s work has been included on several prominent international exhibitions, which include the South African Pavilion at the 56th Venice Biennale in Italy, All the World’s Futures and at the 20th Biennale of Sydney, The future is already here – it’s just not evenly distributed. Machona’s work has also appearedin exhibitions at the Brooklyn Museum in New York and at the Zeitz Museum of Contemporary Art Africa in Cape Town.

Machona works with sculpture, performance, new media, photography and film. The most notable aspect of his work is his innovative use of currency—particularly decommissioned Zimbabwean dollars—as an aesthetic material. Machona’s current work engages with issues of migration, transnationalism, social interaction and xenophobia in Africa.

In 2013, Machona featured in Mail and Guardian’s 200 Young South African’s supplemental and was selected by Business Day and the Johannesburg Art Fair in 2011 as one of the top ten young African artists practicing in South Africa. In 2019 Machona was included on the group exhibition Still Here Tomorrow to High Five You Yesterday at Zeitz MOCAA in Cape Town.