Selected Works

Kapwani Kiwanga
Afrogalactica : a brief history of the future, 2012
Reading performance and video projection

Kapwani Kiwanga
Shady, 2018
Shadecloth and steel
Work: 400 x 1000 x 300 cm
Kapwani Kiwanga
Vumbi, 2012
HD video

Kapwani Kiwanga
Vumbi, 2012
Film with color and sound
31 minutes
Kapwani Kiwanga
Greenbook, Mississippi (1961), 2019
Framed archival pigment print on paper
Frame: 35.1 x 26.4 x 3 cm
Kapwani Kiwanga
Rumours that Maji was a lie..., 2014
Mixed-media installation
Variable Dimensions
Kapwani Kiwanga
Rumours that Maji was a lie..., 2014
Mixed-media installation
Variable Dimensions
Kapwani Kiwanga
Safe Passage, MIT List Visual Arts Center,Cambridge, MA [Exhibition view], 2019

Variable Dimensions
Kapwani Kiwanga
Pink-Blue , 2017
Baker-Miller pink paint, white paint, white fluorescent lights, blue fluorescent lights
Variable Dimensions
Kapwani Kiwanga
Sankofa Pavillion, 2019
Dichroic and toughened glass, metal, acoustic fabric, wood
Work: 220 x 380 x 380 cm
Kapwani Kiwanga
White Gold: Morogoro, 2016
Sisal fiber, metal bars and wire rope
Work: 600 x 500 x 400 cm

Biography

Kapwani Kiwanga studied anthropology and comparative religion at McGill University (Montreal, CA). She has followed the program “La Seine” at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris, and also works at Le Fresnoy (a french national center for contemporary art). She was artist in residence at the MU Foundation in Eindhoven (NL) and at the Box in Bourges (FR).

Working with sound, film, performance, and objects, Kapwani Kiwanga relies on extensive research to transform raw information into investigations of historical narratives and their impact on political, social, and community formation. The Paris-based artist’s work focuses on sites specific to Africa and the African diaspora, examining how certain events expand and unfold into popular and folk narratives, and revealing how these stories take shape in objects and oral histories. Trained as an anthropologist, Kiwanga performs this role in her artistic practice, using historical information to construct narratives about groups of people. Kiwanga is not only invested in the past but also the future, telling Afrofuturist stories and creating speculative dossiers from future civilizations to reflect on the impact of historical events.